Tag Archives: TVT

Adverse Events Statistics Misleading – Transvaginal Mesh is Dangerous

Today’s press release from the Lawfirm Newswire stresses the importance of reporting injuries from TVM.

“Former FDA Program Manager, Madris Tomes, now the founder of Device Events, firmly believes all TVM kits are dangerous. Additionally, although many of the adverse event reports deal with ongoing symptoms, a question arises whether TVMs could cause deaths.

Due to the nature of the reporting system, death may be reported as malfunctions and injuries. Based on current information in the FDA reporting system it is allegedly not clear how many deaths may be related to TVM kits. However, according to Medscape, an FDA review of records for all urogynecologic mesh products spanning the years 2005 to 2010, there were 3,979 reports of malfunctions, injuries and deaths.

“It was not until 2011 that the FDA announced that the serious complications with the TVM kits everyone was reading about in the news were not rare — a reversal of its original stance on the product issued in 2008,” said Austin TVM attorney, Bobby Lee. After the FDA released its revised position on TVM kits, it was revealed they had been sent over 4,000 complaints involving TVM malfunctions, injuries and/or deaths over a five-year period.”

Here are easy to follow instructions for reporting your own mesh injury. If you have new injuries? File a new report!

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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Doubly Traumatized: Pelvic Mesh & the Sexual Abuse Survivor

Dual Trauma

Two things happened this past week that make it imperative to write about the connection between two traumas: sexual abuse and pelvic mesh injury.

First, Melynda, a dually-traumatized woman wrote a tearful story of her trip to get a transvaginal ultrasound:

I arrive at my scheduled time, make my way to radiology and wait for someone to take me back to the room. My pain is an 8-9 at this point and I am starting to shake because, goddammintalltohell, I am so exhausted of having strangers fiddling with my lady parts, I can’t even sit down and relax. (Remember also I am a survivor of child sexual abuse/incest and rape when I was 17 and have had all the wretched trauma of mesh, too).
In walks this older gentleman in scrubs and says, “Are you here for an ultrasound?”
I was so confused. Why is there an old man telling me he is going to be doing my transvaginal ultrasound!!!!??????
I started crying right then and there. “No, no, no, no, NO. I can’t do this with you. I am so sorry, I need a woman tech.”
He tells me it’s him or I will be forced to reschedule. I lose it. I tell him I need some time to calm myself down and then I go lock myself in the bathroom and sit there for 15 minutes while I sob uncontrollably and struggle to breath.
Before this mesh disaster, I wasn’t like this. I could have pelvic exams with no problem. I have been to years of counseling to help me overcome the abuse/incest and rape and I count myself as a survivor of both of those things. But these mesh injuries and the resulting treatments I have to endure. That is what left me sobbing in the hospital bathroom, shaking so hard I couldn’t even hold my phone.

Two days later, Buzzfeed published a document written to an arrogant rapist. The letter set off a maelstrom of outrage. The valiant victim described those hellacious moments when she slowly came to the realization she’d be brutally raped:

I … went to pull down my underwear, and felt nothing. I still remember the feeling of my hands touching my skin and grabbing nothing. I looked down and there was nothing. The thin piece of fabric, the only thing between my vagina and anything else, was missing and everything inside me was silenced. I still don’t have words for that feeling. In order to keep breathing, I thought maybe the policemen used scissors to cut them off for evidence.

Women dancing copy

Freedom is for women, too.

The physical and psychic numbness, immeasurable pain, wanting to shed her own body, and begging for time to process her trauma; while her attacker and the judge continue to intensify his horrific attack by turning the spotlight of blame onto her instead of him. Her words set off a campaign to remove the judge and, at the same time, further ignite the opprobrium of pelvic mesh-injured women who suffer so many of the same symptoms. A pelvic mesh-related injury feels like a rape in the aftermath. For all intents and purposes, it is rape, sometimes with genital mutilation.
For sexual assault victims, mesh pain takes them right back into a post traumatic state. Pelvic mesh victims are offered little redress while the device makers are permitted to increase sales, rush new versions to market, and continue to profit unfettered.

You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice…

How many pelvic mesh victims have uttered these same words? And these:

I am no stranger to suffering. You made me a victim. … For a while, I believed that that was all I was. I had to force myself to … relearn that this is not all that I am. … I am a human being who has been irreversibly hurt, my life was put on hold …
My independence, natural joy, gentleness, and steady lifestyle I had been enjoying became distorted beyond recognition. I became closed off, angry, self deprecating, tired, irritable, empty. The isolation at times was unbearable. You cannot give me back the life I had before that night either. While you worry about your shattered reputation, I …hold … spoons to my eyes to lessen the swelling so that I can see.
I … excuse myself to cry in stairwells. I can tell you all the best places … to cry where no one can hear you. The pain became so bad that I had to explain private details to my boss to let her know why I was leaving. I needed time because continuing day-to-day was not possible. I used my savings … I did not return to work full time … My life was put on hold for over a year, my structure had collapsed.
There are times I did not want to be touched. I have to relearn that I am not fragile, I am capable, I am wholesome, not just livid and weak.

If you would like to join a small support group for people with both mesh injuries and a history of sexual abuse/assault, join here. ,–LINK UPDATED

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome is common to both injuries and healing involves stages. No two women are ever alike and no healing patterns are identical. In hopes for your continued, safe, comforted, and thorough healing, here is a list of the stages:

Stages of healing from sex abuse

Page 1

Stages of healing from sex abuse pg 2

Page 2

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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Partial Pelvic Mesh Removal — Wrong Solution to Permanent Problem

Your surgeon says he or she can snip the part of the mesh sling they can see, a quick operation and you’ll be better. Or says he can cut it to release it because it was put in too tight. Or, he promises a full removal but the operation takes less than an hour and, if the parts go to pathology, most of the mesh is still not accounted for.

Women who knowingly or unknowingly have partial removal surgery come to regret it. They issue strong warnings for the lucky women who read or search for answers online before signing up for a partial removal. Thousands of Urogynecologists and Urologists do partial removals. The very people who profit from mesh tell those specialists how to handle complaints: just cut a little out. Some heartless doctors cut it right there in the office with no anesthesia whatsoever.

The woman who have been through this tell newcomers not to allow a surgeon to cut bits and pieces of mesh but to leave it whole for a qualified surgeon with the skills to necessary to remove the entire device in one operation. They warn that doctors are not telling the truth about those partial surgeries.

Frayed rope is like sliced mesh

Partial removal can be a temporary solution to a permanent problem. Nearly everyone gets temporary relief after a partial surgery. When a rope breaks, the ends fray. That’s what happens with partials. All the ends leak toxic chemicals, stirring up a immune storm inside your body and spring back, eventually attaching to other parts of your vagina, bladder, intestines, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. After a year or two, you develop new symptoms and go looking for a doctor who can help. More than 99% of board certified surgeons will do another partial. Some women have dozens of surgeries before finding help from advocacy groups.

Be very careful. Get the whole thing out in any way you can because you are in the best possible shape to have a good outcome when your surgeon goes after the whole thing and it’s still intact! When mesh is cut, the next surgeon must go searching for shreds of it. They compare that surgery to trying to get bubble gum out of hair or searching for shrapnel.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

If your surgery took less than four hours, consider that it may not be a complete removal, get your medical and surgical records and your pathology report. Learn the dimensions of your implant and ask for an accounting for every piece of it. Before your explant surgery, demand a micro and macro pathology be done. Afterward, get those reports!

We’ve found only five surgeons in the U.S. who consistently prove they removed complete pelvic mesh including arms or anchors (fixation devices):

  • Shlomo Raz, UCLA
  • Dionysis Veronikis, St. Louis, MO
  • Una Lee, Seattle WA
  • Dmitriy Nikolavsky, Syracuse, NY
  • Michael Hibner, Phoenix, AZ

The surgery is very risky but research has shown that is in no more risky that partial removals.

Beware of sugeons loan companies Beware of Mesh News
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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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4 Kinds of Pelvic Mesh and 4 Properties

Four Types of Transvaginal Mesh

     Transvaginal full-length or patch slings are implanted through both abdominal and vaginal incisions and secured with either absorbable sutures or anchors (miniature screws). The full-length sling is roughly two by seven-inches long. A patch is about one by two inches. Examples include: the Gynecare Prolift and the Gynecare Prolift+M.

     Tension-free transvaginal tape is mainly used to treat SUI. The mesh is inserted through your vagina and two small incisions in your lower abdomen near your pelvic bone. To pull the mesh inside, using his finger to identify anatomical markers, the surgeon passes a specialized needle through the area above your pubic bone called the retropublic space, which contains highly vascular tissues and is close to your bowel and bladder. Sutures and bone anchors are not required because it relies on your own tissues to hold it in place. Example: Gynecare Exact.

The transobturator tape procedure eliminates the need for a needle to go into your retropublic space. One or two needles are placed blindly through your groin area. Your surgeon then uses a vaginal incision to help guide the tape under your bladder. Example: Boston Scientific Obtryx.

The mini sling procedure uses only one incision in the vaginal area under the urethra. The mesh is secured with two “self-retaining tips” which are punched into your obturator foramen, the site of many permanent nerve injuries. Some doctors say this reduces the risk for injuries but recent scientific literature reports an equal number of complications. Example: AMS MiniArc Single Incision Sling.

POlypropylene IS FOR VEGIES NetsOnRolls

Properties of Synthetic Surgical Mesh

Synthetic materials are categorized according physical properties: composition (mono-filament or multi-filament), pore size, flexibility, and architecture (knitted or woven). Mesh used in pelvic reconstruction is different from hernia mesh in order to provide ease of use and the capability for the host tissue to grow into it while reducing your risk for erosion, infection, extrusion, and cancer.

     Type I monofilament macroporous polypropylene mesh (preferred synthetic material) has a large pore size, greater than 75 micrometers, facilitates the infiltration of the mesh by macrophages, fibroblast and blood vessels (your body’s wound healing defenses). It is believed to cause less infection as your tissue grows into it. Lightweight Type I mesh has a lower density of polypropylene and is believed to cause less foreign-body response.

     Type II monofilament microporous mesh – allows bacterial infiltration and it is harder for blood vessels and fibers to grow into because of the small pore size (smaller than 10 micrometers) resulting in a higher risk of recalcitrant infections.

     Type III multifilament mesh – has small interstices, (less than 10 micrometers) and bacteria that is less than one micrometer can replicate within its interstices. It is less than optimal because it allows access to macrophages and limits your ability to fight bacterial colonization within the spaces. There is also an increased risk of bacteria adherence due to increased surface area of the mesh (biofilm).

     Type IV meshes – are sub-microporous coated biomaterials with pores of less than one micrometer. They are generally avoided in pelvic reconstructive surgery.

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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It’s Not Your Fault – By DebC

Below is an excerpt from another blog, MESHMENOT, by DebC who makes a very important point, especially for women. Simply put, it is not your fault that you had mesh implanted.

It Is Not Your Fault
Are you suffering from mesh complications and feeling guilty for “allowing” mesh to be implanted in your body in the first place?
Well then, I think, that you should think again.
No one  suffering from mesh complications should be feeling guilty.  This is not the patient/victim’s fault.  They should not have known better.  Nobody that is mesh-injured should be blaming themselves regardless of what kind of mesh it was or when they had it implanted.
Many who get mesh are not even given all the facts and options upfront.  I’ve heard from many who did not even know their doctor planned to use mesh until after the fact. The sad truth is that if you walk into almost any doctor’s office today and say you pee a little when you sneeze, he (or she) will probably recommend mesh, despite two FDA warnings, FDA adverse event reports of severe complications, and over 100,000 lawsuits.
Most likely, when you visited your doctor, he downplayed your valid concerns. He may have said the mesh, or tape, or sling he used is not the same thing that’s in the news and he’s chosen a safer product. He may have said his product was your only option. Serious and debilitating mesh complications rarely are acknowledged by most members of the medical community, so those who seek a second or third opinions find no real answers.
You are not to blame. When it comes down to it, most people trust their doctors. Period. That’s what we were taught to do: listen to our doctor.We are not medical professionals and some doctors will take advantage of that, chastising us for searching for answers online and trying to diagnosing our own complications. Many doctors take offense when their skills are questioned but, fortunately, there are doctors out there who listen and sincerely engage with their patients. There are even a few doctors who remember how to make repairs without using synthetic mesh–they are worth finding.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 9
It’s human nature to kick ourselves in the ass.  Guilt comes too easily for most of us.  It may be because we like to believe we are in control of most things and feel we should be. It’s easy to feel like we should have known better, especially when we start doing more research and realize just how dangerous mesh is.  Then we wish that, somehow, we would have  known better than the doctors who recommended mesh in the first place.  But, hind-sight is 20/20 and most of us do not believe we know better than our doctors until we wind up dealing with all kinds of unnecessary mesh complications. – by DebC on MeshMeNot

 


“Even paranoids have real enemies”—Delmore Schwartz 1913-1966


 

The definition of paranoia is “an unfounded or exaggerated distrust of others.” When thousands of mesh victims gather and share stories of horrific infections, injuries, illnesses, disabilities, and even death, distrust of the maker of the product is certainly not unfounded.
If you’d like to read more on this mesh topic and many others, start at Deb C’s website here and look around while you’re there for more of her well-researched and fascinating writings.


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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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22+ Crucial Questions to Ask Surgeon Before Pelvic Mesh Surgery

 1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

 2. Why is the operation necessary?

 3. I am aware that a bladder sling or hernia mesh is made of polypropylene and the material is the same, whether it is called a “tape” or “minitape.” I do not want polypropylene in my body. Are you willing to do the surgery without the use of synthetic surgical mesh? {__ I am allergic to polypropylene (check if applies to you).}

4. What are my alternatives to this procedure? (for example: I am aware the Burch Procedure has the same rate of success as synthetic surgical mesh. Are you able to do an alternative procedure)

 5. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will those benefits last?

 6. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

 7. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

 8. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

9. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology, Urogynecology, Gynecology, General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery?  Other?

10. Where will my surgery be performed?

11. How long will my operation take?

12. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

13. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

14. Do you have to cut close to larger nerves to complete this operation?

15. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

16. What is the risk of mesh erosion into healthy organs from this surgery?

17. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide antibiotic prophylaxis?

18. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

19. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

20. What can I expect during recovery?

21. How will my life be changed for the good or bad after this operation?

22. How many future surgeries might I expect after this surgery if there are complications?

Added question: Are you planning to have a salesmen in the operating room with you? I do__ do not___ prefer to have a sales representative in the OR with me.

(Click here for download of copy with fill-in-the-blanks.)


 

 POLY IS FOR ADA RAMPS


 

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current. Example here.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

From PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com                        © Peggy Day November 27, 2015

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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25 Crucial Questions to Ask Your Mesh Removal Surgeon

1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

2. Why is the operation necessary?

3. What are my alternatives to this procedure?

4. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will the benefits last?

5. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

6. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

7. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

8. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology  Urogynecology  Gynecology √ General Surgery  Colorectal Surgery?  None Other 

9. Where will surgery be performed?

10. How long will my operation take?

11. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

12. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

13. If mesh is embedded in my bladder or urethra, do you have the skills to take it out?

14. If mesh is embedded into my obturator spaces, do you have the skills to take it out?

15. If mesh has eroded into my colon or rectum, do you have the skills to take it out?

16. If I have more than one mesh, do you have the skills to find it and take it out?

17. If mesh is close to a blood vessel, do you have the skills to remove it?

18. If mesh is close to a large nerve, do you have the skills to remove it with the least amount of damage?

 19. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

 20. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide prophylaxis to address biofilm-related infections?

21. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

22. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

23. What can I expect during recovery?

24. What are the ways will my life be different after this surgical procedure?

25. How many future surgeries should I expect?

(Click HERE for Printable Version with Fill in the Blanks.)


Mesh is not for bodies in motion

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon. Example here.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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26 Pelvic Mesh Complications Your Doc Never Mentioned

Welcome to the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide! This page is like a Table of Contents.

Over 4.2 million women have the implants and a quarter to a third of them suffer debilitating complications while doctors say, “It’s not the mesh.” The FDA warned in both 2008 and 2011 that complications are serious. Too many women are finding out they were right all along, it is the mesh. 

If you’re having trouble with mesh, here is a list of 26 complications in the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Sign up for updates to learn more and take the first step on your healing journey.

POLY IS FOR CABLES copy

26 Mesh Complications Your Doctor Never Warned You About:

1) Intractable Pain (pain that doesn’t go away) – Some people wake up from implant surgery knowing something is wrong. It is too tight or the pain is beyond measuring. Part 1 talks about the post operative pain from pelvic mesh & Part 2 is one woman’s journey with pelvic mesh pain.

2) Excessive BleedingBleeding happens but when is it too much? When to call the doctor? How to regain strength after heavy bleeding

3) Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection – Urinary tract infections are serious health-risks and can involve the bladder and kidney. When mesh is stuck in the bladder it continually irritates the bladder until it is removed surgically. Learn how to prevent UTIs and test yourself at home and to distinguish a bladder infection from a kidney infection.

     4) Wound infectionsA bladder sling can act like a petri dish harboring and incubating strong, sometimes drug-resistant bacteria. Left undiagnosed, they can lead to a delay in wound healing, even open up wide and deep surgical wounds and putting your life at risk.

5) Bladder injuryA slip of the knife, a puncture from an ice-pick like trocar, sling pulled so tight that it cuts the bladder. A bladder injury is one of the most difficult to repair. One study says it happens 10% of the time, another say 75%!

6) Bowel InjuryWhen a part of the bowel is nicked, fecal matter seeps into the interior of the body, when it the diagnosis is delayed or completely missed, patients become extremely ill.

7) Fistula (a hole between two organs) – Imagine your urine draining out of your vagina or your stool coming out. Fistula is all to common and deeply embarrassing for women.

8) Wound Opening Up After Stitches(also called dehiscence) – You think your surgery is healing and you are trying to get back on your feet and back to normal. Then your wound starts to open up. Dehiscence delays healing for a very long time.

9) Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion) As many as one patient in three experiences erosion from mesh. Would you agree to mesh if you were told the odds that you wouldn’t enjoy sex ever again were one in three?

10) Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”The odds that mesh surgery won’t cure your incontinence is the same as other surgical repairs: one in three.

11) Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”A mesh that is implanted too tight can slow down or stop your urine stream for about four percent of patients. Why does your surgeons “handedness” (right- or left-handed) affect your outcome?

12) Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse One study found 26% of women found sex too painful after mesh surgery.

13) Multiple surgeriesWhen things go wrong, often the solution is another surgery and another. Some women have had over a dozen surgeries to correct mesh complications. More surgery = more scarring.

14) Vaginal scarring/shrinkage – Vaginal scarring: one of the most emotionally and physically difficult problems to heal.

15) Emotional DamageNaturally, an injury to a woman’s re-creative center causes emotional pain but can we allow doctors to blame the women?

16) Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damageStinging, burning, pins-and-needles, numbness all are signs of nerve damage. Even the way your body was positioned during surgery can cause nerve damage.

17) Obturator Nerve – Symptoms in your mid-thighs (saddle region).

18) Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric Nerve – Symptoms in your pubic region.

19) Genitofemoral Nerve – Symptoms in your inner groin.

20) Femoral Nerve – Symptoms in your outer thighs

21) Pudendal Nerve Entrapment – Symptoms in your “sit spot.”

22) Fibular Neuropathy – Symptoms on the outside lower legs

23) Saphenous Nerve – Symptoms on your inner lower legs

24) Piriformis Syndrome – Symptoms across your buttocks.

25) Sciatica – Symptoms all the way down your leg.

26) Peripheral Neuropathy – Symptoms from the bottom of your feet and up your legs, even your hands can be involved.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 2


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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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The Pelvis in Flames – Autoimmune Diseases and Pelvic Mesh

Why does one woman instantly react to a plastic mesh implant and another not even notice it, at least for several years? Every body reacts to the polypropylene mesh because the mesh is biologically incompatible with human tissue. The level of bio-incompatibility  “determines the host’s inflammatory response, scar plate formation, tissue ingrowth, and subsequent mesh performance, including prosthetic compliance.” It may be a decade or so before some women experience rejection symptoms: the burning, constant gnawing like there is a fire inside, debilitating damage, erosions, infections, urinary troubles and more, because as the body changes as it ages.

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 7.44.56 AM

Polypropylene mesh was designed to provoke a chronic inflammatory response that varies from woman to woman; from mild to severe. The minute the synthetic mesh came in contact with your healthy tissue, the fire started. Your body’s immune response recognizes non-native citizens like bacteria, viruses, and toxins, a splinter, foreign substances, or a synthetic mesh implant and responds to antigens (proteins attached to the surface of cells, viruses, or bacteria) by initiating a fierce defense. However, no matter how much your body tries to reject the plastic mesh implant, it can’t because it is trapped in the structures of your pelvis.

Eventually your healthy immune response may become compromised and give way to autoimmune disease. Those same antibodies that are charged with protecting your body from foreign matter may begin to attack your body’s own proteins and tissues, thinking they are foreign. Although the problem in autoimmune disorders is the immune system, the symptoms are displayed by the organ that is under attack. Essentially, autoimmune disease is an immune system with gone wild and turning on itself.

In the general population autoimmune disorders predominantly affect women and about three percent of the general population. More research is need to to determine how many mesh recipients have develMESH IF FOR FOODpolypropylene NETONROLLoped autoimmune diseases but, anecdotally, mesh victims who gather on the internet in groups of between 200 and a thousand participants connect the onset of an autoimmune process to the date of their mesh implant. Once a patient develops one autoimmune condition, the odds of developing another are greatly increased. Research about one autoimmune disease, celiac disease, showed that maintaining a gluten-free diet will dramatically reduce the number of antibodies in an affected child’s body. We recommend more research to determine if complete mesh removal will improve autoimmune symptoms.

Below is a list of autoimmune diseases found in the anecdotes of pelvic mesh owners:

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Do you have an autoimmune disease after a mesh transplant? What do you think?


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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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Peripheral Neuropathy: Burning Feet as a Pelvic Mesh Complication

Some people express some surprise that even nurses have fallen for the doctor’s explanation that they should have a pelvic mesh implant, thinking that nurses would have done more diligent research. Nurses were trained to believe that all of the drugs and all of the devices they used had been carefully studied and approved. (Note: none of it was ever approved, it was “cleared.”) In most cases, only after being injured themselves, do they begin to do the careful research. One such nurse wrote this about peripheral neuropathy:

 “I have found that neuropathy is fairly common with mesh patients. Yes, the vagina is considered contaminated, so the surgery is considered ‘clean contaminated’ surgery. The real problem is that these implants should have never been implanted in a contaminated area.
“I kept telling my neurologist that my pelvis and feet and legs are connected. I can go into detail about why my theory we develop neuropathy makes sense to me.
“My theory is that all the nerves in the pelvis—part of the sacral nerves and L4-5 from the sciatic nerve (are involved). Because of severe inflammation, and foreign body response and mesh pulling on the nerves, we develop neuropathy. The gynecologist I am seeing here in Charlotte confirmed what I thought: that the pain we have from the pudendal nerve and the neuropathy in our feet and legs are related.
“The caudal epidurals stopped the pain and tingling, I can have another in August, I still feel some low level tinging and burning, but nothing like it was. The nurses told me they are treating other mesh patients with the same symptoms I have.
NervousSystem PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY SHADING
Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage to the nerves to your arms, hands, legs and feet—your periphery. The pain can be felt as tingling, burning, or feeling like you are wearing a stocking or glove. Some say ‘pins and needles,” others that their feet are on fire. More than a hundred types of peripheral neuropathy have been identified. Today’s blog is an overview—look for more about this soon from Mesh Troubles. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) after mesh surgery can be related to many causes.

Here are just some things that cause peripheral neuropathy:

•    Vitamin deficiencies
⁃    Alcoholism
•    Hormonal deficiencies
•    Autoimmune diseases
⁃    Diabetes mellitis
⁃    Lupus
⁃    Rheumatoid arthritis
⁃    Guillain-Barre syndrome
•    Compression above area with symptoms
•    Exposure to poisons
⁃    Heavy metals
⁃    Medications
•    Infections
⁃    Viral or bacterial infections
⁃    Lyme Disease
⁃    Shingles
⁃    Epstein-Barr
⁃    Hep C
⁃    HIV/AIDS
•    Inherited disorders
⁃    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
⁃    Amyloid polyneuropathy

There are three different kinds of nerves that can be affected by PN: sensory nerves that receive sensations such as heat, pain, or touch; motor nerves that control how you muscles move; and autonomic nerves that control functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, digestion and bladder function.
Peripheral neuropathy w foot drop copy
Symptoms:
◦    Gradual onset of numbness and tingling in your feet or hands which may move upward into your legs or arms
◦    Burning pain in affect areas
◦    Sharp, jabbing or electric-like pain
◦    Areas sensitive to touch
◦    Lack of coordination
◦    Muscle weakness or paralysis (motor nerves)
◦    Bowel or bladder problems (autonomic nerves)
Peripheral neuralgia may affect one nerve or more, one area or several different areas.
Treatments: First the good news. Correcting the underlying problem may heal PN. “Peripheral nerves have the ability to regenerate axons, as long as the nerve cell itself has not died, which may lead to functional recovery over time. Correcting an underlying condition often can result in the neuropathy resolving on its own as the nerves recover or regenerate.”

Self-care including maintaining optimal weight, exercise to reduce cramps and improve muscle strength and prevent muscle wasting, a healthy diet to correct vitamin deficiencies an minimize or eliminate sugar intake, limiting alcohol and exposure to toxins and medications, treatment of injuries, stopping smoking to improve circulation, meticulous care of your feet including visualizing them frequently can improve your symptoms.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen can help milder cases and narcotic medications may be effective. There are some creams or ointments like Llidocaine or Capsaicin may help.

A “TENS unit” (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation)  can provide pain relief for some people. The therapy involves attaching electrodes to your skin at the site of your pain or near associated nerves and then administering a gentle electrical current. TENS has been shown in some studies to help diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Sometimes hand or foot braces or orthopedic shoes help reduce pain or prevent injuries. Acupuncture, massage, and herbal medications help as well. Surgically, releasing a nerve can improve compressions injuries when a single nerve is involved.

Your physician may prescribe antidepressants but we recommend caution with those types of medication because one of the most common side-effects of antidepressants is neuropathy. Recently, anti-convulsant medications have been used to control the pain but  they are fraught with side-effects that are worse than the initial problems.

The very same process that was used to clear (mind you, they never say “approve”) plastic mesh to be irretrievably placed inside your body, is the one that cleared the drugs to be prescribed for nerve pain. The list of side-effects from these drugs (here is one example) is enough to make you run for the hills, yet they are routinely prescribed for peripheral neuropathy—some of them even cause PN! It makes no sense to me. Does it to you? You are the one who has to live with long-term effects for the rest of your life. Not the doctor you saw for fifteen minutes. What you you think about it? Isn’t your life is too valuable to risk taking a medication, like Paxil, that causes you to have suicidal thoughts in the middle of struggling with the devastating consequences of synthetic surgical mesh?

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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