Tag Archives: Trouble with Mesh

10 Facts of Life for the Pelvic Mesh Newbie

  1. Mesh injuries and illness rates are much higher than medical studies show. Most published research favorable to mesh is funded by the manufacturer.
  2. Mesh is mesh. There is no “old mesh.” It is all that same thing with minor changes in shape or route. Polypropylene is just plain damaging to human tissue.
  3. The pelvis is a perilous place to conduct surgery. Even human or pig mesh or simple suture repairs can cause problems–but not as frequently as pelvic mesh.
  4. Your new pelvic problem is very likely caused by the mesh itself. Fearing litigation and believing the manufacturer’s advertising, doctors are reluctant to blame the device.
  5. Some pain and infection get better with removal–but not all.

    KIM Mesh

  6. Very few surgeons know how to take mesh out, so they fake it with partial revision surgeries that lead to new complications and more surgeries. More surgeries = more scar tissue.
  7. There is no justice. There are almost no medical malpractice lawsuits anymore. There is no money in malpractice litigation for the lawyers since “Tort Reform” was enacted in all 50 states. Doctors and the AMA lobbied and paid for Tort Reform.
  8. About class actions, there is no money for a lawyer who represents a patient with pain, infection, nerve damage, etc. because recent settlements are based on the number of surgeries you’ve had and not how sick or injured you are.
  9. Don’t wait for legal recourse before finding a competent surgeon. Consider crowd-funding to get well.
  10. You shouldn’t have to do this alone. Join a mesh support group but keep a critical mind and don’t accept advice just because another person is adamant in their post Be careful. Be sure to double check any answers you receive. A good internet search can provide your best education.

 


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Polypropylene – “Not for use in human body”

“Do not use this Phillips Sumika material in medical applications involving permanent implantation in the human body or permanent contact with body fluids or tissues.

Do not use Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company material in medical applications involving brief or temporary implantation in the human body or contact with human body fluids or tissue unless the material is provided by Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company under an agreement which expressly acknowledges the contemplated use.

Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company makes no representation, promise, express warranty or implied warranty concerning the suitability of this material for use in implantation in the human body or in contact with internal body fluids or tissues.”

Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company Material Product Safety Sheet (undated)

 

Here is an early warning about polypropylene predating pelvic mesh

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Pelvic Mesh: Your Device is Tracked. So Are You

The FDA requires Medical Device distributors to track your device up until and including your death—including your name, address, phone number and social security number. Title 21 of the FDA regulations require the device distributor, final distributor, or multiple distributors (devices that move from patient to patient), promptly upon purchase, provide the manufacturer the name and addresses of all distributors along its journey to you, including the lot number, the date the device was received, and the person from whom it was received.

Tracking Devices vs. Device Tracking

The last distributor before your implant must also provide the manufacturer with their own name and address, the unique device identifier (e.g. lot or serial number), your name, address, phone number and social security number—unless you refuse to release that information under 821.55(a).* They must also record the date of your implant, name, address, and phone of both implanting surgeon and regular physician, and the date the device was explanted.

If a patient dies, the end point distributor must provide the date of death, name, address, and phone of treating physician, date of any explant with contact information for explanting physician, and, where applicable, and the date the device was returned to the manufacturer, retired from use or disposed of in any other way.

* Any patient receiving a device subject to tracking may refuse permission to release their name, address, phone and social security number or any other identifying information but, the hundreds of pelvic mesh implantees who were not told they had an implant or that a tracking system exists, would have no way to refuse permission. Title 21 can override a patient’s right to privacy if the “health or safety of the patient requires that such persons have access to the information.”

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Pudendal Nerve Injury Caused by Improper Insertion of TOT Obturator Tape – Pelvic Pain

The two main nerve complications TOT-injured women report in support groups are 1) pudendal and 2) obturator in that order. Because most studies do not evaluate for nerve injuries past 3-12 months, there is no scientific estimate of how common the injury is. Our experience is that it is extremely common. Pudendal injury causes persistent pain localized around the urethra and around the clitoris, irradiating to the one labia majora (maximum at the lower edge of symphysis) or both.

Polypropylene creates cripples when placed inside the pelvis.

The pudendal nerve is nowhere near the pathway of an obturator tape so how did the women get injured? The mystery may have been solved by three Czech investigators.

In 2011, Jaromir Masata & Petr Hubka & Alois Martan decided to look into why their patient, a 48 years old female obtained a pudendal nerve injury. After receiving a TVT-O, the woman experienced what the authors saw as an “atypical” postoperative pain that continued without relief for three years. While the authors treated her with injections and replaced her sling with yet another dubious tape, the work they did to track down the cause of her injury is valuable.

Authors circled scar and placed a “+” pointing to correct placement location.

The woman’s insertion scar (see Figure 1) was in the wrong place. By using a cadaver to trace the aberrant passage of her sling, the researchers found it intersected with the pudendal nerve. How many others were injured this way? Are you one of them? Was your transobturator tape placed incorrectly? If the manufacturer provided short videos and an instruction sheet, was that adequate training for your surgeon?

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FDA Publishes 50 Known Pelvic Mesh Device Problems – Approves Anyway

The FDA received nearly 9,000 complaints about predicate devices before approving a new TOT. Here is a list from the January 2007 application for FDA clearance for the Align Urethral Support. This list does not include many device-related problems like bleeding, infection, pain, dyspareunia (inability to have sex) or those on the list in the right hand column on this page.

The Align (Bard Avaulta) was approved anyway on March 21, 2007.

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What Does a Bladder Really Look Like? Pelvic Mesh Implants

The bladder and urethra play a key role in pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. The most frequent cause of SUI is early bladder prolapse.

Figure 1. Illustration from patent application 2004. “u” is called a urethra. “B” is called a bladder.

As we age, the bladder loses support from neighboring fascia, muscles, ligaments and tendons and drops down, folding itself over supporting structures underneath (and over slings or sutures after surgeries). The folding narrows the outlet or urethra. Imagine you are holding a rolled up throw rug under one arm to carry it, it folds over and the hole inside it narrows and flattens.

Figure 2. Offset oil funnel.

Mesh illustrations in journal articles, public information handouts, and patent applications are inaccurately show the urethra as a straw-shaped tube through which urine flows. See example in Figure 1. It is really a sideways funnel — “offset” like the photo of the oil funnel in Figure 2. Figure 3. is a healthy bladder.

Figure 3. Healthy non-prolapsing bladder.

How in the world did the patent office and the FDA clear this product, a mesh tape with wing-like extensions for treating female urinary incontinence US 8047982 B2, when the illustration clearly shows a tube and the device is designed to fit a straight tube?

It is no wonder patients become confused.

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    • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at

daywriter1@gmail.com

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Why So Many Doctors are Bad Doctors – Mesh Trouble

To those who have been participating in surgical mesh discussions, it comes as no surprise that the practice of medicine in 2016 has completely broken down. It is not safe to become a patient these days yet, by the very nature of living in this world of fast cars and eating unhealthy food, it is inevitable that most people will need to enter the Healthcare System someday and take their chances that they professionals will do right by them.

Discussions abound about how surgical mesh was cleared for implantation inside human bodies by corrupt Food and Drug Administration officials — insiders from the pharmaceutical industry. The number of deaths that occur from medical mistakes is over 300,000, and is considered the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Many other discussion participants report cruel, dismissive, even dangerous treatment by doctors in office and hospital settings; yet most of us are unaware of two things that should be — but are not — changing the game in favor of the patient.

prison mesh welded wire copy

In 1986 Congress passed legislation that bad doctors must be reported to a national database called the National Practitioner Data Base [PD2] in order to protect the consumer (The Healthcare Quality Improvement Act). That is you. But you have no access to the database either to report bad doctors or to find out if your doctor is bad. Usually, the only way to discover you have chosen a bad doctor is to find out the hard way, by being exposed to rude, aggressive, dismissive, or harmful treatment yourself. You may get lucky and be part of an private discussion group between patients and hear about some of the bad ones and avoid trouble, even disaster, for yourself. Websites like Vitals.com, etc. submit to pressure from lawyers and doctors to remove feedback that would have negative consequences to the doctors and are not reliable if you are trying to protect yourself from harm.

Every battle has its heroes and for patients and we found two: Bob Wachter and an anonymous emergency doctor (Shadowfax) who runs a fittingly named blog, “Moving Meat.” Both of them acknowledge that today’s medicine puts the priority of the patient well below the protection of the doctor’s career and reputation. Both say the NPDB is not doing its job.

What do you think? What is your experience in today’s medical world? Do you feel safe? Protected? How is the Healthcare Improvement Act working for you?

  • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
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    http://community.the-hospitalist.org/2009/06/01/is-hospital-peer-review-a-sham-well-mostly-yes/

    http://allbleedingstops.blogspot.com/2009/06/review-of-peer-review.html

    [PD1]https://www.npdb.hrsa.gov/resources/titleIv.jsp

    [PD2]https://www.npdb.hrsa.gov/topNavigation/aboutUs.jsp

Doubly Traumatized: Pelvic Mesh & the Sexual Abuse Survivor

Dual Trauma

Two things happened this past week that make it imperative to write about the connection between two traumas: sexual abuse and pelvic mesh injury.

First, Melynda, a dually-traumatized woman wrote a tearful story of her trip to get a transvaginal ultrasound:

I arrive at my scheduled time, make my way to radiology and wait for someone to take me back to the room. My pain is an 8-9 at this point and I am starting to shake because, goddammintalltohell, I am so exhausted of having strangers fiddling with my lady parts, I can’t even sit down and relax. (Remember also I am a survivor of child sexual abuse/incest and rape when I was 17 and have had all the wretched trauma of mesh, too).
In walks this older gentleman in scrubs and says, “Are you here for an ultrasound?”
I was so confused. Why is there an old man telling me he is going to be doing my transvaginal ultrasound!!!!??????
I started crying right then and there. “No, no, no, no, NO. I can’t do this with you. I am so sorry, I need a woman tech.”
He tells me it’s him or I will be forced to reschedule. I lose it. I tell him I need some time to calm myself down and then I go lock myself in the bathroom and sit there for 15 minutes while I sob uncontrollably and struggle to breath.
Before this mesh disaster, I wasn’t like this. I could have pelvic exams with no problem. I have been to years of counseling to help me overcome the abuse/incest and rape and I count myself as a survivor of both of those things. But these mesh injuries and the resulting treatments I have to endure. That is what left me sobbing in the hospital bathroom, shaking so hard I couldn’t even hold my phone.

Two days later, Buzzfeed published a document written to an arrogant rapist. The letter set off a maelstrom of outrage. The valiant victim described those hellacious moments when she slowly came to the realization she’d be brutally raped:

I … went to pull down my underwear, and felt nothing. I still remember the feeling of my hands touching my skin and grabbing nothing. I looked down and there was nothing. The thin piece of fabric, the only thing between my vagina and anything else, was missing and everything inside me was silenced. I still don’t have words for that feeling. In order to keep breathing, I thought maybe the policemen used scissors to cut them off for evidence.

Women dancing copy

Freedom is for women, too.

The physical and psychic numbness, immeasurable pain, wanting to shed her own body, and begging for time to process her trauma; while her attacker and the judge continue to intensify his horrific attack by turning the spotlight of blame onto her instead of him. Her words set off a campaign to remove the judge and, at the same time, further ignite the opprobrium of pelvic mesh-injured women who suffer so many of the same symptoms. A pelvic mesh-related injury feels like a rape in the aftermath. For all intents and purposes, it is rape, sometimes with genital mutilation.
For sexual assault victims, mesh pain takes them right back into a post traumatic state. Pelvic mesh victims are offered little redress while the device makers are permitted to increase sales, rush new versions to market, and continue to profit unfettered.

You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice…

How many pelvic mesh victims have uttered these same words? And these:

I am no stranger to suffering. You made me a victim. … For a while, I believed that that was all I was. I had to force myself to … relearn that this is not all that I am. … I am a human being who has been irreversibly hurt, my life was put on hold …
My independence, natural joy, gentleness, and steady lifestyle I had been enjoying became distorted beyond recognition. I became closed off, angry, self deprecating, tired, irritable, empty. The isolation at times was unbearable. You cannot give me back the life I had before that night either. While you worry about your shattered reputation, I …hold … spoons to my eyes to lessen the swelling so that I can see.
I … excuse myself to cry in stairwells. I can tell you all the best places … to cry where no one can hear you. The pain became so bad that I had to explain private details to my boss to let her know why I was leaving. I needed time because continuing day-to-day was not possible. I used my savings … I did not return to work full time … My life was put on hold for over a year, my structure had collapsed.
There are times I did not want to be touched. I have to relearn that I am not fragile, I am capable, I am wholesome, not just livid and weak.

If you would like to join a small support group for people with both mesh injuries and a history of sexual abuse/assault, join here. ,–LINK UPDATED

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome is common to both injuries and healing involves stages. No two women are ever alike and no healing patterns are identical. In hopes for your continued, safe, comforted, and thorough healing, here is a list of the stages:

Stages of healing from sex abuse

Page 1

Stages of healing from sex abuse pg 2

Page 2

I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
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Partial Pelvic Mesh Removal — Wrong Solution to Permanent Problem

Your surgeon says he or she can snip the part of the mesh sling they can see, a quick operation and you’ll be better. Or says he can cut it to release it because it was put in too tight. Or, he promises a full removal but the operation takes less than an hour and, if the parts go to pathology, most of the mesh is still not accounted for.

Women who knowingly or unknowingly have partial removal surgery come to regret it. They issue strong warnings for the lucky women who read or search for answers online before signing up for a partial removal. Thousands of Urogynecologists and Urologists do partial removals. The very people who profit from mesh tell those specialists how to handle complaints: just cut a little out. Some heartless doctors cut it right there in the office with no anesthesia whatsoever.

The woman who have been through this tell newcomers not to allow a surgeon to cut bits and pieces of mesh but to leave it whole for a qualified surgeon with the skills to necessary to remove the entire device in one operation. They warn that doctors are not telling the truth about those partial surgeries.

Frayed rope is like sliced mesh

Partial removal can be a temporary solution to a permanent problem. Nearly everyone gets temporary relief after a partial surgery. When a rope breaks, the ends fray. That’s what happens with partials. All the ends leak toxic chemicals, stirring up a immune storm inside your body and spring back, eventually attaching to other parts of your vagina, bladder, intestines, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. After a year or two, you develop new symptoms and go looking for a doctor who can help. More than 99% of board certified surgeons will do another partial. Some women have dozens of surgeries before finding help from advocacy groups.

Be very careful. Get the whole thing out in any way you can because you are in the best possible shape to have a good outcome when your surgeon goes after the whole thing and it’s still intact! When mesh is cut, the next surgeon must go searching for shreds of it. They compare that surgery to trying to get bubble gum out of hair or searching for shrapnel.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

If your surgery took less than four hours, consider that it may not be a complete removal, get your medical and surgical records and your pathology report. Learn the dimensions of your implant and ask for an accounting for every piece of it. Before your explant surgery, demand a micro and macro pathology be done. Afterward, get those reports!

We’ve found only five surgeons in the U.S. who consistently prove they removed complete pelvic mesh including arms or anchors (fixation devices):

  • Shlomo Raz, UCLA
  • Dionysis Veronikis, St. Louis, MO
  • Una Lee, Seattle WA
  • Dmitriy Nikolavsky, Syracuse, NY
  • Michael Hibner, Phoenix, AZ

The surgery is very risky but research has shown that is in no more risky that partial removals.

Beware of sugeons loan companies Beware of Mesh News
If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.
PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.





Why Not Talk About Hernia Mesh?

I often hear that people think that there is too much attention paid to pelvic mesh victims at the cost to the hernia victims. After all, it’s the same material that is used, just cut in a different shape and placed in a different part of the body. And, truth is, pelvic organ prolapse is very similar to a hernia —both are caused by a weakening of muscles.

When I planned this blog, I decided to focus on one type of mesh because it is the one I know best and because I planned to go into depth with my research. In the back of my mind, I want to do another blog called the Hernia Mesh Owner’s Guide —some day.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

I hope hernia sufferers will look at the parts of this blog that apply to them because so many complications are the same: the denial by doctors, the nerve injuries, the salesmen in the operating room, the body’s foreign body reaction and the resulting autoimmune diseases, the cancer risk, the pain, loss of consortium, and the loss of ability to work. The great difficulties getting it removed are similar. Mesh shreds, twists, curls, folds, stretches, migrates, disintegrates, etc. no matter where it is placed.

In looking at why the two entities got separated in the first place, it is important to look at the history of several legal battles. Hernia mesh underwent similar legal attacks about 20 years ago. Many versions of hernia were removed, recalled, and quietly taken off the market. Many people sued and won and many lost. In the end, really, the makers won. They just changed a few elements of hernia mesh, paid for scientific studies that proved it was a great product, and went right on marketing it (the same thing is happening with transvaginal mesh).

So, when the makers found a new application for mesh, putting it into women’s most private, most valued and most delicate place, it cause NEW problems because of the anatomy of the pelvis. The lawyers, like chairs on a tipping ship, rushed to represent this new disaster and abandoned the hernia meshes because there is no longer any money in those cases.

Hernia mesh victims: please be aware that not a single victim made this separation; it was done by lawyers.

Sadly, there are probably no lawyers who represent hernia mesh victims unless it involves malpractice and even that is very hard to prove. BigPharma and the AMA put legislation in place long ago to limit the amount you can win. (Tort reform only benefits those entities). BigPharma also controls much of major media. Thank goodness for social media!

 

Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.