Tag Archives: Transobturator Tape

FDA Responds to Pelvic Mesh Counterfeit Resin Allegations

Mostlyn Law alleged that Boston Scientific smuggled counterfeit resin containing toxic selenium and used it in mesh products after 2010. The FDA responded  January 5, 2017 by requiring BSC to prove that the material is safe for human use and to analyze the contents of their own mesh.
In its response, FDA doesn’t recommend removal of the suspected counterfeit material claiming the removal surgery is more risky than keeping selenium in your body.


Counterfeit Class Actions:
“In addition to the mass tort docket, Boston Scientific said it also faces two class action lawsuits by plaintiffs who allege that the company used counterfeit or adulterated resin from China to make the mesh in its pelvic mesh devices and not brand-name, American-made mesh as specified in regulatory approval for the devices. It said one case was stayed to allow the Food and Drug Administration to issue a determination about the counterfeit allegations.The company said the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of West Virginia has also requested information about resin used in the company’s pelvic mesh devices.” — Lexis Legal News Boston Scientific Has Pacts To Settle About 37

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Comprehensive List of Pelvic Mesh Products

Since the 1950’s, surgical mesh has been used for all types of internal repairs, particularly hernia repairs to strengthen the abdominal wall. In the 1970’s, gynecologist and urogynecologists began to develop and patent products which used surgical mesh to treat urinary incontinence (most often due to early bladder sagging) and later more pronounced pelvic organ prolapse. Gynecologists began to cut small pieces of hernia surgical mesh into precise shapes.

A company by the name of Versica Medical introduced a product called the “Vesica Bone Anchoring System”, which used sutures attached to small screws to urinary incontinence. Vesica’s system was one of the precursors to transvaginal mesh devices that followed, beginning with the ProteGen. 

Below is a comprehensive list of transvaginal (pelvic) mesh products. Expect this list to be updated with more information like dates of use soon.

American Medical System

  • Apogee
  • BioArc
  • Elevate
  • In-Fast Ultra Transvaginal Sling
  • MiniArc Precise Single Incision Sling
  • Monarc Subfascial Hammock
  • Perigee
  • SPARC Self-Fixating Sling System
  • Straight-In

Boston Scientific

  • Advantage Fit System
  • Advantage Sling System
  • Arise
  • Lynx Suprapubic Mid-Urethral Sling System
  • Obtryx Curved Single
  • Obtryx Mesh Sling
  • Pinnacle Pelvic Floor Repair Kit
  • Pinnacle Pelvic Floor Repair Kit II
  • Polyform Synthetic Mesh
  • Prefyx Mid U Mesh Sling System
  • Prefyx PPS System
  • Solyx SIS System
  • Uphold Vaginal Support System

Covidian

  • Duo
  • IVS Tunneler Intra-Vaginal Sling
  • IVS Tunneler Placement Device
  • Parietene Polypropylene Mesh
  • Surgipro Polyproylene Surgical Mesh

C.R. Bard

  • Align
  • Avaulta BioSynthetic Support System
  • Avaulta Plus BioSynthetic Support System
  • Avaulta Solo Support System
  • Avaulta Solo Synthetic Support System
  • CollaMend Implant
  • Faslata Allograft
  • Pelvicol Tissue
  • Pelvilace
  • PelviSoft Biomesh
  • Pelvitex Polypropylene Mesh
  • Ugytex
  • Ugytex Dual Knit Mesh
  • Uretex
  • Uretex TO
  • Uretex TOO2
  • Uretex TOO3

Coloplast (out of business)

  • Minitape
  • Omnisure
  • Smartmesh
  • Restorelle
  • T-Sling-Universal Polypropylene Sling System
  • Aris-Transobturator Sling System
  • Supris-Suprapubic Sling System

Cook Medical System (out of business)

  • Surgiss Biodesign Tension-Free Urethral Sling
  • Surgiss Biodesign Anterior Pelvic Floor Graft
  • Surgiss Biodesign Posterior Pelvic Floor Graft
  • Cook Urological Stratasis Tension-Free Urethral Sling.

Ethicon Division (Johnson & Johnson)

  • Prosima
  • Gynemesh PS
  • Prolene Polypropylene Mesh Patch Secur
  • Prolift
  • Prolift+M
  • Prosima
  • TVT
  • TVT Abbrevo
  • TVT Exact
  • TVT Obturator (TVT-0)
  • TVT Retropubic System
  • TVT Secur

Mentor Corporation

  • Obtape (recalled – was implanted between 2003 and 2006)

Other companies:

  • Caldera
  • Sofradim
  • Neomedic Sling

______________________________________________________

Early device, Perigee, with insertion tools. Note frayed ends of mesh.

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Specialized MRI and 3D Ultrasound See Mesh – CT Can’t

Too many surgeons are sending patients to have a CT (Cat Scan) and,  when the radiologist says he/she can’t see mesh, tell the patient the mesh must have disappeared or dissolved when a CT cannot identify mesh. Plastic mesh does not dissolve. Sadly too many patients have their pain disrespected or disregarded when the problem is the doctor’s. Only specialized 3D Ultrasound with the right technician and radiologist (more on this coming in another blog soon) and specialized MRI’s with the skills to see it and read it can identify mesh.
Here is a graphic, courtesy of www.scbtmr.org that you can print out an take to your doctor.

MRI to find mesh

How to see mesh with an MRI

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Why So Many Doctors are Bad Doctors – Mesh Trouble

To those who have been participating in surgical mesh discussions, it comes as no surprise that the practice of medicine in 2016 has completely broken down. It is not safe to become a patient these days yet, by the very nature of living in this world of fast cars and eating unhealthy food, it is inevitable that most people will need to enter the Healthcare System someday and take their chances that they professionals will do right by them.

Discussions abound about how surgical mesh was cleared for implantation inside human bodies by corrupt Food and Drug Administration officials — insiders from the pharmaceutical industry. The number of deaths that occur from medical mistakes is over 300,000, and is considered the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Many other discussion participants report cruel, dismissive, even dangerous treatment by doctors in office and hospital settings; yet most of us are unaware of two things that should be — but are not — changing the game in favor of the patient.

prison mesh welded wire copy

In 1986 Congress passed legislation that bad doctors must be reported to a national database called the National Practitioner Data Base [PD2] in order to protect the consumer (The Healthcare Quality Improvement Act). That is you. But you have no access to the database either to report bad doctors or to find out if your doctor is bad. Usually, the only way to discover you have chosen a bad doctor is to find out the hard way, by being exposed to rude, aggressive, dismissive, or harmful treatment yourself. You may get lucky and be part of an private discussion group between patients and hear about some of the bad ones and avoid trouble, even disaster, for yourself. Websites like Vitals.com, etc. submit to pressure from lawyers and doctors to remove feedback that would have negative consequences to the doctors and are not reliable if you are trying to protect yourself from harm.

Every battle has its heroes and for patients and we found two: Bob Wachter and an anonymous emergency doctor (Shadowfax) who runs a fittingly named blog, “Moving Meat.” Both of them acknowledge that today’s medicine puts the priority of the patient well below the protection of the doctor’s career and reputation. Both say the NPDB is not doing its job.

What do you think? What is your experience in today’s medical world? Do you feel safe? Protected? How is the Healthcare Improvement Act working for you?

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    http://community.the-hospitalist.org/2009/06/01/is-hospital-peer-review-a-sham-well-mostly-yes/

    http://allbleedingstops.blogspot.com/2009/06/review-of-peer-review.html

    [PD1]https://www.npdb.hrsa.gov/resources/titleIv.jsp

    [PD2]https://www.npdb.hrsa.gov/topNavigation/aboutUs.jsp

Doubly Traumatized: Pelvic Mesh & the Sexual Abuse Survivor

Dual Trauma

Two things happened this past week that make it imperative to write about the connection between two traumas: sexual abuse and pelvic mesh injury.

First, Melynda, a dually-traumatized woman wrote a tearful story of her trip to get a transvaginal ultrasound:

I arrive at my scheduled time, make my way to radiology and wait for someone to take me back to the room. My pain is an 8-9 at this point and I am starting to shake because, goddammintalltohell, I am so exhausted of having strangers fiddling with my lady parts, I can’t even sit down and relax. (Remember also I am a survivor of child sexual abuse/incest and rape when I was 17 and have had all the wretched trauma of mesh, too).
In walks this older gentleman in scrubs and says, “Are you here for an ultrasound?”
I was so confused. Why is there an old man telling me he is going to be doing my transvaginal ultrasound!!!!??????
I started crying right then and there. “No, no, no, no, NO. I can’t do this with you. I am so sorry, I need a woman tech.”
He tells me it’s him or I will be forced to reschedule. I lose it. I tell him I need some time to calm myself down and then I go lock myself in the bathroom and sit there for 15 minutes while I sob uncontrollably and struggle to breath.
Before this mesh disaster, I wasn’t like this. I could have pelvic exams with no problem. I have been to years of counseling to help me overcome the abuse/incest and rape and I count myself as a survivor of both of those things. But these mesh injuries and the resulting treatments I have to endure. That is what left me sobbing in the hospital bathroom, shaking so hard I couldn’t even hold my phone.

Two days later, Buzzfeed published a document written to an arrogant rapist. The letter set off a maelstrom of outrage. The valiant victim described those hellacious moments when she slowly came to the realization she’d be brutally raped:

I … went to pull down my underwear, and felt nothing. I still remember the feeling of my hands touching my skin and grabbing nothing. I looked down and there was nothing. The thin piece of fabric, the only thing between my vagina and anything else, was missing and everything inside me was silenced. I still don’t have words for that feeling. In order to keep breathing, I thought maybe the policemen used scissors to cut them off for evidence.

Women dancing copy

Freedom is for women, too.

The physical and psychic numbness, immeasurable pain, wanting to shed her own body, and begging for time to process her trauma; while her attacker and the judge continue to intensify his horrific attack by turning the spotlight of blame onto her instead of him. Her words set off a campaign to remove the judge and, at the same time, further ignite the opprobrium of pelvic mesh-injured women who suffer so many of the same symptoms. A pelvic mesh-related injury feels like a rape in the aftermath. For all intents and purposes, it is rape, sometimes with genital mutilation.
For sexual assault victims, mesh pain takes them right back into a post traumatic state. Pelvic mesh victims are offered little redress while the device makers are permitted to increase sales, rush new versions to market, and continue to profit unfettered.

You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice…

How many pelvic mesh victims have uttered these same words? And these:

I am no stranger to suffering. You made me a victim. … For a while, I believed that that was all I was. I had to force myself to … relearn that this is not all that I am. … I am a human being who has been irreversibly hurt, my life was put on hold …
My independence, natural joy, gentleness, and steady lifestyle I had been enjoying became distorted beyond recognition. I became closed off, angry, self deprecating, tired, irritable, empty. The isolation at times was unbearable. You cannot give me back the life I had before that night either. While you worry about your shattered reputation, I …hold … spoons to my eyes to lessen the swelling so that I can see.
I … excuse myself to cry in stairwells. I can tell you all the best places … to cry where no one can hear you. The pain became so bad that I had to explain private details to my boss to let her know why I was leaving. I needed time because continuing day-to-day was not possible. I used my savings … I did not return to work full time … My life was put on hold for over a year, my structure had collapsed.
There are times I did not want to be touched. I have to relearn that I am not fragile, I am capable, I am wholesome, not just livid and weak.

If you would like to join a small support group for people with both mesh injuries and a history of sexual abuse/assault, join here. ,–LINK UPDATED

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome is common to both injuries and healing involves stages. No two women are ever alike and no healing patterns are identical. In hopes for your continued, safe, comforted, and thorough healing, here is a list of the stages:

Stages of healing from sex abuse

Page 1

Stages of healing from sex abuse pg 2

Page 2

I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
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Partial Pelvic Mesh Removal — Wrong Solution to Permanent Problem

Your surgeon says he or she can snip the part of the mesh sling they can see, a quick operation and you’ll be better. Or says he can cut it to release it because it was put in too tight. Or, he promises a full removal but the operation takes less than an hour and, if the parts go to pathology, most of the mesh is still not accounted for.

Women who knowingly or unknowingly have partial removal surgery come to regret it. They issue strong warnings for the lucky women who read or search for answers online before signing up for a partial removal. Thousands of Urogynecologists and Urologists do partial removals. The very people who profit from mesh tell those specialists how to handle complaints: just cut a little out. Some heartless doctors cut it right there in the office with no anesthesia whatsoever.

The woman who have been through this tell newcomers not to allow a surgeon to cut bits and pieces of mesh but to leave it whole for a qualified surgeon with the skills to necessary to remove the entire device in one operation. They warn that doctors are not telling the truth about those partial surgeries.

Frayed rope is like sliced mesh

Partial removal can be a temporary solution to a permanent problem. Nearly everyone gets temporary relief after a partial surgery. When a rope breaks, the ends fray. That’s what happens with partials. All the ends leak toxic chemicals, stirring up a immune storm inside your body and spring back, eventually attaching to other parts of your vagina, bladder, intestines, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. After a year or two, you develop new symptoms and go looking for a doctor who can help. More than 99% of board certified surgeons will do another partial. Some women have dozens of surgeries before finding help from advocacy groups.

Be very careful. Get the whole thing out in any way you can because you are in the best possible shape to have a good outcome when your surgeon goes after the whole thing and it’s still intact! When mesh is cut, the next surgeon must go searching for shreds of it. They compare that surgery to trying to get bubble gum out of hair or searching for shrapnel.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

If your surgery took less than four hours, consider that it may not be a complete removal, get your medical and surgical records and your pathology report. Learn the dimensions of your implant and ask for an accounting for every piece of it. Before your explant surgery, demand a micro and macro pathology be done. Afterward, get those reports!

We’ve found only five surgeons in the U.S. who consistently prove they removed complete pelvic mesh including arms or anchors (fixation devices):

  • Shlomo Raz, UCLA
  • Dionysis Veronikis, St. Louis, MO
  • Una Lee, Seattle WA
  • Dmitriy Nikolavsky, Syracuse, NY
  • Michael Hibner, Phoenix, AZ

The surgery is very risky but research has shown that is in no more risky that partial removals.

Beware of sugeons loan companies Beware of Mesh News
If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.
PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.





4 Kinds of Pelvic Mesh and 4 Properties

Four Types of Transvaginal Mesh

     Transvaginal full-length or patch slings are implanted through both abdominal and vaginal incisions and secured with either absorbable sutures or anchors (miniature screws). The full-length sling is roughly two by seven-inches long. A patch is about one by two inches. Examples include: the Gynecare Prolift and the Gynecare Prolift+M.

     Tension-free transvaginal tape is mainly used to treat SUI. The mesh is inserted through your vagina and two small incisions in your lower abdomen near your pelvic bone. To pull the mesh inside, using his finger to identify anatomical markers, the surgeon passes a specialized needle through the area above your pubic bone called the retropublic space, which contains highly vascular tissues and is close to your bowel and bladder. Sutures and bone anchors are not required because it relies on your own tissues to hold it in place. Example: Gynecare Exact.

The transobturator tape procedure eliminates the need for a needle to go into your retropublic space. One or two needles are placed blindly through your groin area. Your surgeon then uses a vaginal incision to help guide the tape under your bladder. Example: Boston Scientific Obtryx.

The mini sling procedure uses only one incision in the vaginal area under the urethra. The mesh is secured with two “self-retaining tips” which are punched into your obturator foramen, the site of many permanent nerve injuries. Some doctors say this reduces the risk for injuries but recent scientific literature reports an equal number of complications. Example: AMS MiniArc Single Incision Sling.

POlypropylene IS FOR VEGIES NetsOnRolls

Properties of Synthetic Surgical Mesh

Synthetic materials are categorized according physical properties: composition (mono-filament or multi-filament), pore size, flexibility, and architecture (knitted or woven). Mesh used in pelvic reconstruction is different from hernia mesh in order to provide ease of use and the capability for the host tissue to grow into it while reducing your risk for erosion, infection, extrusion, and cancer.

     Type I monofilament macroporous polypropylene mesh (preferred synthetic material) has a large pore size, greater than 75 micrometers, facilitates the infiltration of the mesh by macrophages, fibroblast and blood vessels (your body’s wound healing defenses). It is believed to cause less infection as your tissue grows into it. Lightweight Type I mesh has a lower density of polypropylene and is believed to cause less foreign-body response.

     Type II monofilament microporous mesh – allows bacterial infiltration and it is harder for blood vessels and fibers to grow into because of the small pore size (smaller than 10 micrometers) resulting in a higher risk of recalcitrant infections.

     Type III multifilament mesh – has small interstices, (less than 10 micrometers) and bacteria that is less than one micrometer can replicate within its interstices. It is less than optimal because it allows access to macrophages and limits your ability to fight bacterial colonization within the spaces. There is also an increased risk of bacteria adherence due to increased surface area of the mesh (biofilm).

     Type IV meshes – are sub-microporous coated biomaterials with pores of less than one micrometer. They are generally avoided in pelvic reconstructive surgery.





Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide to Inner Female Pelvic Anatomy –

Mother Nature wisely hid some pretty important organs in your pelvic basin—your uterus and vagina, bladder and—which are protected by your bones, muscles, joints, ligaments and tendons.
Moving: Muscles, Joints, Ligaments, and Tendons

The major job of your pelvic structure is allowing movement: walking, running, sitting, bending and kneeling. Your bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments do this job. Your pelvis is really a basin with three openings at the bottom. The front of the basin is made of three bones: the ishium (sit bone), ilium, and pubis, and the back consists of your lower spine: sacrum and coccyx, or tailbone. The socket for the top of your femur or leg bone reaches into your pelvis on either side and rides on a something called your acetabulum, a cup-like structure formed where your ischium, ilium, and pubis all meet. Your acetabulum allows you to move your body and moving your body is what keeps you healthy.
Joints are simply the place where two bones connect. They are constructed to allow movement and provide mechanical support. Joints can be fibrous (joined by dense regular, collagen fibers), joined by cartilage (translucent somewhat elastic tissue), or the joint may include a synovial cavity to cushion movement, like your hip joint. Your pelvis holds some of the most powerful ligaments in your body: including your symphysis pubis (front of your pelvis), sacroiliac (connects your sacrum and ilium), and sacrospinous (links each pelvic bone to your sacrum and coccyx and maintains the length of your vagina).pelvic landmarks
Without muscles, both your pelvic and belly contents would fall out. They hold your bladder, vagina, uterus and rectum and your abdominal contents in place. Your pelvic muscles will become important in this book when we discuss one of the major reasons for surgical pelvic mesh: pelvic organ prolapse. Three muscles working together, your puborectalis, pubococcygeus, and iliecoccygeus muscles, create your pelvic floor (perineum) and resist any additional pressure (like when you cough) to keep your urine and stool in check. Two thick membranes cover and protect your pelvic muscles and become important when surgery involves cutting them: your parietal (wall) layer and your visceral (internal organ) layer, which is closer to your abdominal organs.


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

Join our FORUM to continue learning about surgical mesh.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

It’s the Polypropylene, Margaret. Not Fit For Humans

“For the want of a nail the shoe was lost,
For the want of a shoe the horse was lost,
For the want of a horse the rider was lost,
For the want of a rider the battle was lost,
For the want of a battle the kingdom was lost,
And all for the want of a horseshoe-nail.” Benjamin Franklin

Polypropylene has been found to be responsible for more deaths than just mesh patients as a recent examination of MAUDE reports to the FDA reveals. Meanwhile the plastic surgical mesh continues to be sold to patients.

The FDA’s recent announcement that it would reclassify only one application for pelvic mesh is a disaster for anyone wanting to do no harm because in its statement the agency promoted the use of synthetic surgical mesh for other pelvic applications. The only way to protect women from harm and avoid severe and devastating complications is to pressure the FDA to take all synthetic surgical mesh off the market—for good. A failure rate of forty percent (between 37.8 and 44.2%) and an erosion rate of 41.5% percent (see Figure 1. Lee, SY) represents an unacceptable iatrogenic mass casualty no matter how you toss the dice. It’s not the application (vaginal vs abdominal) or the surgical technique that’s harming many thousands of patients, it’s the material itself: the polypropylene.

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 8.44.26 AM

Polypropylene begins its life as crude oil, like any plastic product. Polypropylene is made up of a combination of ingredients combined to produce a product that will resist temperature change and keep its tensile strength when shaped into strands. Microscopically, polypropylene is a polymer—a large molecule composed of many repeating subunits. When polypropylene is stretched into a fiber, its strength is dependent on the quality of ingredients, the width of the strand, and the shape the strand.

438px-Polypropylene_tacticity.svg

Polypropylene Chain

Polypropylene is a favorite child of plastics scientists for containers, automobile parts, rugs, and countless other applications often illustrated on this blog. Patients are told the device is inert, completely safe, does not react with the body yet, it is the same material that is used to make thousands of household 81YYBL4yzwL._SY355_products, like scouring pads. Imagine taking Scotch-Brite Scrub pad and stuffing it into your most private spot.

Polypropylene reactions: Although marketers call mesh inert, when polypropylene materials come in contact with human tissue, both sides of the interchange suffer in very dramatic ways. Plastic mesh reacts, degrades, shrinks, curls, rolls, or migrates in a woman’s body. The human host is vulnerable to allergic reactions, foreign body responses, organ injury and migration of the material. If a patient reacts badly, she is in an alarming predicament: it is nearly impossible to take pelvic mesh out.

Allergic reactions to polypropylene are said to be rare and it is nearly impossible to predict who will react. Allergists disagree on what testing method to use to diagnose an allergy to polypropylene. Foreign body responses are much more common. A few pathologists took a look at hernia mesh and all of the samples they examined demonstrated rejection responses.

POLY IS FOR COAXIAL CABLESAlthough allergists believe that polypropylene carried a low allergic response, they say the longer it is left in the body, the more likely a reaction will occur. The skin is said to spit out a suture sometimes but it is nearly impossible for a body to spit out pelvic mesh.

The same material used in transvaginal mesh was once declared unfit for the human body. In 2013, lawyers uncovered emails showing that CRBard, tried to deny the company knew it was unfit until prosecution lawyers forced them to divulge secret company emails. On Thursday this week, Mostlyn Law filed an injunction against Boston Scientific alleging the corporation smuggled a resin which it added to pelvic mesh products between 2011 and 2012.

•∞•

Recently, I looked at who died from mesh and tripped onto a little known fact–one polypropylene suture, Prolene, was involved in one tenth of the deaths from Ethicon Corporation products—a quarter of all suture-related deaths reported to MedWatch. Over the past decade, Prolene failures were found in 39 of 417 Ethicon product deaths yet the FDA never warned the public about the suture and there is no evidence that the agency is even aware of the problem. MAUDE event descriptions characterized failures leading to deaths from breaks in the suture or knots which unraveled. Reading the stories, I could only imagine the surgeon’s umbrage. After many hours of high-risk surgery where he carefully applied his many years of training and masterful skills to save his patient’s life, he lost his patient—through no fault of his own. A piece of polypropylene suture broke or failed. “All for the want of a nail.”

Prolene maude deaths

Until polypropylene is removed from all medical devices, sadly, women and men will continue to suffer and die.

•∞•

Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.




How to File Your Own Device Complaint to the FDA

printer logoHOW TO FILE YOUR OWN DEVICE COMPLAINT
TO THE FDA –
©Peggy Day

You oe aomeone you know has been hurt by a device. You want to let the FDA know about it, but it is so complicated. Here is a step-by-step guide.

This worksheet works best if you print out these pages and fill them in advance. (Click here for a printable copy)  You’ll be ready to make the best, most effective report you can in one sitting. Settle in with a cuppa tea or whatever relaxes you.

Now: click on this link:   https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/medwatch/index.cfm?action=consumer.reporting.home

The first page you should see should look like this:

FDA MEDWATCH FRONT 1

Go ahead and click on “Consumer/Patient.”

On the next page, check the box for medical device.

FDA MEDWATCH 2

 

Next, check everything that applies:

FDA MEDWATCH 3

Write every detail you know about the situation. Don’t hold back, this is the place to let your feelings flow. Don’t worry, you can always file a new report if new information or new details come to you.

FDA MEDWATCH 5

If you have any lab results or information you’d like to make public, add them here.

FDA MEDWATCH 6

Add the date of the event if you know it. (Very important!)

FDA MEDWATCH 7

Here is where you fill in as much information about the device as you know. If you have no idea what the device is, write as much as you do know or write: “Unknown pelvic sling,” “Unknown hernia mesh,” etc. Do your best.

FDA MEDWATCH 8

FDA MEDWATCH 9

Some of the following information will be made available to others. You decide what you want to share.

FDA MEDWATCH 10

FDA MEDWATCH 11

FDA MEDWATCH 12

The following is information to identify the reporter (you). The more information you offer, the more credible your report will be.

FDA MEDWATCH 13

Should you decide to check the box below, be prepared to be contacted by the manufacturer of the device. Remember, their job is to protect the company, not to ensure or provide the best patient care.

FDA MEDWATCH 14

©Peggy Day