Tag Archives: Polypropylene

10 Facts of Life for the Pelvic Mesh Newbie

  1. Mesh injuries and illness rates are much higher than medical studies show. Most published research favorable to mesh is funded by the manufacturer.
  2. Mesh is mesh. There is no “old mesh.” It is all that same thing with minor changes in shape or route. Polypropylene is just plain damaging to human tissue.
  3. The pelvis is a perilous place to conduct surgery. Even human or pig mesh or simple suture repairs can cause problems–but not as frequently as pelvic mesh.
  4. Your new pelvic problem is very likely caused by the mesh itself. Fearing litigation and believing the manufacturer’s advertising, doctors are reluctant to blame the device.
  5. Some pain and infection get better with removal–but not all.

    KIM Mesh

  6. Very few surgeons know how to take mesh out, so they fake it with partial revision surgeries that lead to new complications and more surgeries. More surgeries = more scar tissue.
  7. There is no justice. There are almost no medical malpractice lawsuits anymore. There is no money in malpractice litigation for the lawyers since “Tort Reform” was enacted in all 50 states. Doctors and the AMA lobbied and paid for Tort Reform.
  8. About class actions, there is no money for a lawyer who represents a patient with pain, infection, nerve damage, etc. because recent settlements are based on the number of surgeries you’ve had and not how sick or injured you are.
  9. Don’t wait for legal recourse before finding a competent surgeon. Consider crowd-funding to get well.
  10. You shouldn’t have to do this alone. Join a mesh support group but keep a critical mind and don’t accept advice just because another person is adamant in their post Be careful. Be sure to double check any answers you receive. A good internet search can provide your best education.

 


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Polypropylene – “Not for use in human body”

“Do not use this Phillips Sumika material in medical applications involving permanent implantation in the human body or permanent contact with body fluids or tissues.

Do not use Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company material in medical applications involving brief or temporary implantation in the human body or contact with human body fluids or tissue unless the material is provided by Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company under an agreement which expressly acknowledges the contemplated use.

Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company makes no representation, promise, express warranty or implied warranty concerning the suitability of this material for use in implantation in the human body or in contact with internal body fluids or tissues.”

Phillips Sumika Polypropylene Company Material Product Safety Sheet (undated)

 

Here is an early warning about polypropylene predating pelvic mesh

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    • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at

daywriter1@gmail.com

    .

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Comprehensive List of Pelvic Mesh Products

Since the 1950’s, surgical mesh has been used for all types of internal repairs, particularly hernia repairs to strengthen the abdominal wall. In the 1970’s, gynecologist and urogynecologists began to develop and patent products which used surgical mesh to treat urinary incontinence (most often due to early bladder sagging) and later more pronounced pelvic organ prolapse. Gynecologists began to cut small pieces of hernia surgical mesh into precise shapes.

A company by the name of Versica Medical introduced a product called the “Vesica Bone Anchoring System”, which used sutures attached to small screws to urinary incontinence. Vesica’s system was one of the precursors to transvaginal mesh devices that followed, beginning with the ProteGen. 

Below is a comprehensive list of transvaginal (pelvic) mesh products. Expect this list to be updated with more information like dates of use soon.

American Medical System

  • Apogee
  • BioArc
  • Elevate
  • In-Fast Ultra Transvaginal Sling
  • MiniArc Precise Single Incision Sling
  • Monarc Subfascial Hammock
  • Perigee
  • SPARC Self-Fixating Sling System
  • Straight-In

Boston Scientific

  • Advantage Fit System
  • Advantage Sling System
  • Arise
  • Lynx Suprapubic Mid-Urethral Sling System
  • Obtryx Curved Single
  • Obtryx Mesh Sling
  • Pinnacle Pelvic Floor Repair Kit
  • Pinnacle Pelvic Floor Repair Kit II
  • Polyform Synthetic Mesh
  • Prefyx Mid U Mesh Sling System
  • Prefyx PPS System
  • Solyx SIS System
  • Uphold Vaginal Support System

Covidian

  • Duo
  • IVS Tunneler Intra-Vaginal Sling
  • IVS Tunneler Placement Device
  • Parietene Polypropylene Mesh
  • Surgipro Polyproylene Surgical Mesh

C.R. Bard

  • Align
  • Avaulta BioSynthetic Support System
  • Avaulta Plus BioSynthetic Support System
  • Avaulta Solo Support System
  • Avaulta Solo Synthetic Support System
  • CollaMend Implant
  • Faslata Allograft
  • Pelvicol Tissue
  • Pelvilace
  • PelviSoft Biomesh
  • Pelvitex Polypropylene Mesh
  • Ugytex
  • Ugytex Dual Knit Mesh
  • Uretex
  • Uretex TO
  • Uretex TOO2
  • Uretex TOO3

Coloplast (out of business)

  • Minitape
  • Omnisure
  • Smartmesh
  • Restorelle
  • T-Sling-Universal Polypropylene Sling System
  • Aris-Transobturator Sling System
  • Supris-Suprapubic Sling System

Cook Medical System (out of business)

  • Surgiss Biodesign Tension-Free Urethral Sling
  • Surgiss Biodesign Anterior Pelvic Floor Graft
  • Surgiss Biodesign Posterior Pelvic Floor Graft
  • Cook Urological Stratasis Tension-Free Urethral Sling.

Ethicon Division (Johnson & Johnson)

  • Prosima
  • Gynemesh PS
  • Prolene Polypropylene Mesh Patch Secur
  • Prolift
  • Prolift+M
  • Prosima
  • TVT
  • TVT Abbrevo
  • TVT Exact
  • TVT Obturator (TVT-0)
  • TVT Retropubic System
  • TVT Secur

Mentor Corporation

  • Obtape (recalled – was implanted between 2003 and 2006)

Other companies:

  • Caldera
  • Sofradim
  • Neomedic Sling

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Early device, Perigee, with insertion tools. Note frayed ends of mesh.

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4 Kinds of Pelvic Mesh and 4 Properties

Four Types of Transvaginal Mesh

     Transvaginal full-length or patch slings are implanted through both abdominal and vaginal incisions and secured with either absorbable sutures or anchors (miniature screws). The full-length sling is roughly two by seven-inches long. A patch is about one by two inches. Examples include: the Gynecare Prolift and the Gynecare Prolift+M.

     Tension-free transvaginal tape is mainly used to treat SUI. The mesh is inserted through your vagina and two small incisions in your lower abdomen near your pelvic bone. To pull the mesh inside, using his finger to identify anatomical markers, the surgeon passes a specialized needle through the area above your pubic bone called the retropublic space, which contains highly vascular tissues and is close to your bowel and bladder. Sutures and bone anchors are not required because it relies on your own tissues to hold it in place. Example: Gynecare Exact.

The transobturator tape procedure eliminates the need for a needle to go into your retropublic space. One or two needles are placed blindly through your groin area. Your surgeon then uses a vaginal incision to help guide the tape under your bladder. Example: Boston Scientific Obtryx.

The mini sling procedure uses only one incision in the vaginal area under the urethra. The mesh is secured with two “self-retaining tips” which are punched into your obturator foramen, the site of many permanent nerve injuries. Some doctors say this reduces the risk for injuries but recent scientific literature reports an equal number of complications. Example: AMS MiniArc Single Incision Sling.

POlypropylene IS FOR VEGIES NetsOnRolls

Properties of Synthetic Surgical Mesh

Synthetic materials are categorized according physical properties: composition (mono-filament or multi-filament), pore size, flexibility, and architecture (knitted or woven). Mesh used in pelvic reconstruction is different from hernia mesh in order to provide ease of use and the capability for the host tissue to grow into it while reducing your risk for erosion, infection, extrusion, and cancer.

     Type I monofilament macroporous polypropylene mesh (preferred synthetic material) has a large pore size, greater than 75 micrometers, facilitates the infiltration of the mesh by macrophages, fibroblast and blood vessels (your body’s wound healing defenses). It is believed to cause less infection as your tissue grows into it. Lightweight Type I mesh has a lower density of polypropylene and is believed to cause less foreign-body response.

     Type II monofilament microporous mesh – allows bacterial infiltration and it is harder for blood vessels and fibers to grow into because of the small pore size (smaller than 10 micrometers) resulting in a higher risk of recalcitrant infections.

     Type III multifilament mesh – has small interstices, (less than 10 micrometers) and bacteria that is less than one micrometer can replicate within its interstices. It is less than optimal because it allows access to macrophages and limits your ability to fight bacterial colonization within the spaces. There is also an increased risk of bacteria adherence due to increased surface area of the mesh (biofilm).

     Type IV meshes – are sub-microporous coated biomaterials with pores of less than one micrometer. They are generally avoided in pelvic reconstructive surgery.





It’s the Polypropylene, Margaret. Not Fit For Humans

“For the want of a nail the shoe was lost,
For the want of a shoe the horse was lost,
For the want of a horse the rider was lost,
For the want of a rider the battle was lost,
For the want of a battle the kingdom was lost,
And all for the want of a horseshoe-nail.” Benjamin Franklin

Polypropylene has been found to be responsible for more deaths than just mesh patients as a recent examination of MAUDE reports to the FDA reveals. Meanwhile the plastic surgical mesh continues to be sold to patients.

The FDA’s recent announcement that it would reclassify only one application for pelvic mesh is a disaster for anyone wanting to do no harm because in its statement the agency promoted the use of synthetic surgical mesh for other pelvic applications. The only way to protect women from harm and avoid severe and devastating complications is to pressure the FDA to take all synthetic surgical mesh off the market—for good. A failure rate of forty percent (between 37.8 and 44.2%) and an erosion rate of 41.5% percent (see Figure 1. Lee, SY) represents an unacceptable iatrogenic mass casualty no matter how you toss the dice. It’s not the application (vaginal vs abdominal) or the surgical technique that’s harming many thousands of patients, it’s the material itself: the polypropylene.

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 8.44.26 AM

Polypropylene begins its life as crude oil, like any plastic product. Polypropylene is made up of a combination of ingredients combined to produce a product that will resist temperature change and keep its tensile strength when shaped into strands. Microscopically, polypropylene is a polymer—a large molecule composed of many repeating subunits. When polypropylene is stretched into a fiber, its strength is dependent on the quality of ingredients, the width of the strand, and the shape the strand.

438px-Polypropylene_tacticity.svg

Polypropylene Chain

Polypropylene is a favorite child of plastics scientists for containers, automobile parts, rugs, and countless other applications often illustrated on this blog. Patients are told the device is inert, completely safe, does not react with the body yet, it is the same material that is used to make thousands of household 81YYBL4yzwL._SY355_products, like scouring pads. Imagine taking Scotch-Brite Scrub pad and stuffing it into your most private spot.

Polypropylene reactions: Although marketers call mesh inert, when polypropylene materials come in contact with human tissue, both sides of the interchange suffer in very dramatic ways. Plastic mesh reacts, degrades, shrinks, curls, rolls, or migrates in a woman’s body. The human host is vulnerable to allergic reactions, foreign body responses, organ injury and migration of the material. If a patient reacts badly, she is in an alarming predicament: it is nearly impossible to take pelvic mesh out.

Allergic reactions to polypropylene are said to be rare and it is nearly impossible to predict who will react. Allergists disagree on what testing method to use to diagnose an allergy to polypropylene. Foreign body responses are much more common. A few pathologists took a look at hernia mesh and all of the samples they examined demonstrated rejection responses.

POLY IS FOR COAXIAL CABLESAlthough allergists believe that polypropylene carried a low allergic response, they say the longer it is left in the body, the more likely a reaction will occur. The skin is said to spit out a suture sometimes but it is nearly impossible for a body to spit out pelvic mesh.

The same material used in transvaginal mesh was once declared unfit for the human body. In 2013, lawyers uncovered emails showing that CRBard, tried to deny the company knew it was unfit until prosecution lawyers forced them to divulge secret company emails. On Thursday this week, Mostlyn Law filed an injunction against Boston Scientific alleging the corporation smuggled a resin which it added to pelvic mesh products between 2011 and 2012.

•∞•

Recently, I looked at who died from mesh and tripped onto a little known fact–one polypropylene suture, Prolene, was involved in one tenth of the deaths from Ethicon Corporation products—a quarter of all suture-related deaths reported to MedWatch. Over the past decade, Prolene failures were found in 39 of 417 Ethicon product deaths yet the FDA never warned the public about the suture and there is no evidence that the agency is even aware of the problem. MAUDE event descriptions characterized failures leading to deaths from breaks in the suture or knots which unraveled. Reading the stories, I could only imagine the surgeon’s umbrage. After many hours of high-risk surgery where he carefully applied his many years of training and masterful skills to save his patient’s life, he lost his patient—through no fault of his own. A piece of polypropylene suture broke or failed. “All for the want of a nail.”

Prolene maude deaths

Until polypropylene is removed from all medical devices, sadly, women and men will continue to suffer and die.

•∞•

Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.




22+ Crucial Questions to Ask Surgeon Before Mesh Surgery

 1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

 2. Why is the operation necessary?

 3. I am aware that a bladder sling or hernia mesh is made of polypropylene and the material is the same, whether it is called a “tape” or “minitape.” I do not want polypropylene in my body. Are you willing to do the surgery without the use of synthetic surgical mesh? {__ I am allergic to polypropylene (check if applies to you).}

4. What are my alternatives to this procedure? (for example: I am aware the Burch Procedure has the same rate of success as synthetic surgical mesh. Are you able to do an alternative procedure)

 5. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will those benefits last?

 6. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

 7. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

 8. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

9. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology, Urogynecology, Gynecology, General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery?  Other?

10. Where will my surgery be performed?

11. How long will my operation take?

12. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

13. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

14. Do you have to cut close to larger nerves to complete this operation?

15. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

16. What is the risk of mesh erosion into healthy organs from this surgery?

17. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide antibiotic prophylaxis?

18. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

19. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

20. What can I expect during recovery?

21. How will my life be changed for the good or bad after this operation?

22. How many future surgeries might I expect after this surgery if there are complications?

Added question: Are you planning to have a salesmen in the operating room with you? I do__ do not___ prefer to have a sales representative in the OR with me.

(Click here for download of copy with fill-in-the-blanks.)


 

 POLY IS FOR ADA RAMPS


 

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current. Example here.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

From PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com                        © Peggy Day November 27, 2015