Tag Archives: Pelvic Pain

FDA Responds to Pelvic Mesh Counterfeit Resin Allegations

Mostlyn Law alleged that Boston Scientific smuggled counterfeit resin containing toxic selenium and used it in mesh products after 2010. The FDA responded  January 5, 2017 by requiring BSC to prove that the material is safe for human use and to analyze the contents of their own mesh.
In its response, FDA doesn’t recommend removal of the suspected counterfeit material claiming the removal surgery is more risky than keeping selenium in your body.


Counterfeit Class Actions:
“In addition to the mass tort docket, Boston Scientific said it also faces two class action lawsuits by plaintiffs who allege that the company used counterfeit or adulterated resin from China to make the mesh in its pelvic mesh devices and not brand-name, American-made mesh as specified in regulatory approval for the devices. It said one case was stayed to allow the Food and Drug Administration to issue a determination about the counterfeit allegations.The company said the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of West Virginia has also requested information about resin used in the company’s pelvic mesh devices.” — Lexis Legal News Boston Scientific Has Pacts To Settle About 37

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Specialized MRI and 3D Ultrasound See Mesh – CT Can’t

Too many surgeons are sending patients to have a CT (Cat Scan) and,  when the radiologist says he/she can’t see mesh, tell the patient the mesh must have disappeared or dissolved when a CT cannot identify mesh. Plastic mesh does not dissolve. Sadly too many patients have their pain disrespected or disregarded when the problem is the doctor’s. Only specialized 3D Ultrasound with the right technician and radiologist (more on this coming in another blog soon) and specialized MRI’s with the skills to see it and read it can identify mesh.
Here is a graphic, courtesy of www.scbtmr.org that you can print out an take to your doctor.

MRI to find mesh

How to see mesh with an MRI

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RECIPE for Mesh Victims: Pasta Prima Vera

(A little comic relief after so much pain)

Pudendal Pasta Primavera Recipe

  • Prep time: Between 20 minutes and 5 hours
  • Cook time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 regular strength Tylenol (you may substitute your choice of pain killer as needed)
  • 1/2 pound vermicelli pasta or spaghetti
  • 1 small bunch precut broccoli
  • 1 small zucchini, diced
  • 1/2 cup plus one unopened bag of frozen peas
  • 1/2 cup snow peas
  • 2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 8 ounce can seeded and diced tomatoes
  • 12 basil leaves, 3 tbsp. chopped or pre-packaged pesto
  • 4 Tbsp. butter
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth (use vegetable broth for vegetarian option)
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt
  • 1 chilled bottle dry French white wine.

 

Method

1 Take pain killer. At the same time:

2 Fill a huge pot with water with water and turn on to “high.” Salt well. Set your strainer in the sink, turn on your timer to 13 minutes and go lay down with your feet up as high as you can tolerate.

  1. When alarm rings, throw pasta and set timer for 7 minutes. You must work quickly. Grab all other ingredients, open them and spread them on the counter.
  2. Put your hands on the edge of counter, legs back about 2 feet away and bend forward, breathe out a big loud sigh and stretch your pelvis so it doesn’t lock up on you while you’re standing. Hold this position for 30 seconds or until timer rings.
  3. At the 7-minute timer, throw broccoli in with the pasta. Boil for 1 minute. (You may try standing on one leg for 30 seconds and then the other if it helps.) Add the snow peas, and the 1./2 cup of frozen peas and boil for 30 more seconds.
  4. Quickly pour pasta and vegetables through the strainer and cool them under water. Leave them in the strainer, set the timer for 10 minutes and run back to lay down again, this time taking the bag of frozen peas with you. Apply to pelvis.
  5. When the timer rings, head back to the kitchen and throw the bag of peas back in the freezer.
  6. In a large sauté pan, heat the butter over medium-high heat. When the butter is hot, throw in the garlic powder, the diced tomatoes and sauté for 2 minutes, stirring often and shifting your weight from side to side.
  7. Pour in the chicken or vegetable broth and turn the heat to high to bring it to a boil. While waiting for it to boil, put one hand on top of another on the counter, lean forward and rest your forehead on the back of your hands, try to stretch your pelvis if it help. Add generous amounts of loud groans or tears as needed.
  8. Add the cream and stir just long enough to combine. Turn the heat down until the cream-chicken broth mixture is just simmering, not boiling.
  9. Add the Parmesan cheese and stir to combine. If the sauce seems too thick—it should be pretty thick, but not gloppy—add some more chicken broth, cream or water.
  10. As soon as the sauce is done or you are running into too much pain, transfer the pasta/vegie mess with tongs into the sauce and toss it around to combine. Add the basil now and salt if needed. Throw some black pepper over everything and grab a dish full to take back with you while you lay down again.
  11. After a half-hour rest, put remaining Pudendal Pasta Primavera in individual dishes and store in fridge. Eat for every meal until gone. If you hurt too much, eat it cold.

Note: You will want a dry white wine with this, ideally a chilled dry French white. Put the bottle against your pelvis for ten minutes at a time until pain relief is felt.

Leave dishes for someone else.

Tried, tested and enjoyed by ©Peggy Day

 

  • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
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Doubly Traumatized: Pelvic Mesh & the Sexual Abuse Survivor

Dual Trauma

Two things happened this past week that make it imperative to write about the connection between two traumas: sexual abuse and pelvic mesh injury.

First, Melynda, a dually-traumatized woman wrote a tearful story of her trip to get a transvaginal ultrasound:

I arrive at my scheduled time, make my way to radiology and wait for someone to take me back to the room. My pain is an 8-9 at this point and I am starting to shake because, goddammintalltohell, I am so exhausted of having strangers fiddling with my lady parts, I can’t even sit down and relax. (Remember also I am a survivor of child sexual abuse/incest and rape when I was 17 and have had all the wretched trauma of mesh, too).
In walks this older gentleman in scrubs and says, “Are you here for an ultrasound?”
I was so confused. Why is there an old man telling me he is going to be doing my transvaginal ultrasound!!!!??????
I started crying right then and there. “No, no, no, no, NO. I can’t do this with you. I am so sorry, I need a woman tech.”
He tells me it’s him or I will be forced to reschedule. I lose it. I tell him I need some time to calm myself down and then I go lock myself in the bathroom and sit there for 15 minutes while I sob uncontrollably and struggle to breath.
Before this mesh disaster, I wasn’t like this. I could have pelvic exams with no problem. I have been to years of counseling to help me overcome the abuse/incest and rape and I count myself as a survivor of both of those things. But these mesh injuries and the resulting treatments I have to endure. That is what left me sobbing in the hospital bathroom, shaking so hard I couldn’t even hold my phone.

Two days later, Buzzfeed published a document written to an arrogant rapist. The letter set off a maelstrom of outrage. The valiant victim described those hellacious moments when she slowly came to the realization she’d be brutally raped:

I … went to pull down my underwear, and felt nothing. I still remember the feeling of my hands touching my skin and grabbing nothing. I looked down and there was nothing. The thin piece of fabric, the only thing between my vagina and anything else, was missing and everything inside me was silenced. I still don’t have words for that feeling. In order to keep breathing, I thought maybe the policemen used scissors to cut them off for evidence.

Women dancing copy

Freedom is for women, too.

The physical and psychic numbness, immeasurable pain, wanting to shed her own body, and begging for time to process her trauma; while her attacker and the judge continue to intensify his horrific attack by turning the spotlight of blame onto her instead of him. Her words set off a campaign to remove the judge and, at the same time, further ignite the opprobrium of pelvic mesh-injured women who suffer so many of the same symptoms. A pelvic mesh-related injury feels like a rape in the aftermath. For all intents and purposes, it is rape, sometimes with genital mutilation.
For sexual assault victims, mesh pain takes them right back into a post traumatic state. Pelvic mesh victims are offered little redress while the device makers are permitted to increase sales, rush new versions to market, and continue to profit unfettered.

You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice…

How many pelvic mesh victims have uttered these same words? And these:

I am no stranger to suffering. You made me a victim. … For a while, I believed that that was all I was. I had to force myself to … relearn that this is not all that I am. … I am a human being who has been irreversibly hurt, my life was put on hold …
My independence, natural joy, gentleness, and steady lifestyle I had been enjoying became distorted beyond recognition. I became closed off, angry, self deprecating, tired, irritable, empty. The isolation at times was unbearable. You cannot give me back the life I had before that night either. While you worry about your shattered reputation, I …hold … spoons to my eyes to lessen the swelling so that I can see.
I … excuse myself to cry in stairwells. I can tell you all the best places … to cry where no one can hear you. The pain became so bad that I had to explain private details to my boss to let her know why I was leaving. I needed time because continuing day-to-day was not possible. I used my savings … I did not return to work full time … My life was put on hold for over a year, my structure had collapsed.
There are times I did not want to be touched. I have to relearn that I am not fragile, I am capable, I am wholesome, not just livid and weak.

If you would like to join a small support group for people with both mesh injuries and a history of sexual abuse/assault, join here. ,–LINK UPDATED

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome is common to both injuries and healing involves stages. No two women are ever alike and no healing patterns are identical. In hopes for your continued, safe, comforted, and thorough healing, here is a list of the stages:

Stages of healing from sex abuse

Page 1

Stages of healing from sex abuse pg 2

Page 2

I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
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When We Need a Surgeon – Guest Post: Lars Aanning

Lars Aanning

I wrote this for the Yankton County Observer (20 April 2016):

When We Need A Surgeon

How we choose a surgeon depends on many factors, and some make more sense than others. For example, for most everyday procedures, such as removing the appendix or gallbladder, a well-trained community surgeon should be a safe bet. For more complex procedures, studies have consistently shown better results from surgeons working in hospitals where such procedures are done more often. A very talented surgeon working in a small community hospital may, in his/her own series, have even better or equivalent results, but such surgeons are the exception. Dr. Chet McVay was that exception and attracted patients from far and wide to South Dakota to have their hernias repaired. He was a meticulous surgeon who kept track of his patients and published his very successful results.

Complex operations, in general, have an increased likelihood of serious and lethal complications, whose diagnosis and successful intervention are more challenging to places that rarely do them. In fact, “failure to rescue” is new concept in healthcare that describes the ability of a hospital to “get it right” when “something goes wrong” and leads to better patient survival.

Bottom line: work closely with your physician to make sure you are referred to the right surgeon and the right place for your operation. Read up on your problem and become familiar with the medical terms. Being informed gives you a head start. Driving the distance easily trumps a life-changing disability. And, finally, ask your physician the question: “Doctor, is this the surgeon you would trust with your own health and that of your family?”


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about finding surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.




Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide to Inner Female Pelvic Anatomy –

Mother Nature wisely hid some pretty important organs in your pelvic basin—your uterus and vagina, bladder and—which are protected by your bones, muscles, joints, ligaments and tendons.
Moving: Muscles, Joints, Ligaments, and Tendons

The major job of your pelvic structure is allowing movement: walking, running, sitting, bending and kneeling. Your bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments do this job. Your pelvis is really a basin with three openings at the bottom. The front of the basin is made of three bones: the ishium (sit bone), ilium, and pubis, and the back consists of your lower spine: sacrum and coccyx, or tailbone. The socket for the top of your femur or leg bone reaches into your pelvis on either side and rides on a something called your acetabulum, a cup-like structure formed where your ischium, ilium, and pubis all meet. Your acetabulum allows you to move your body and moving your body is what keeps you healthy.
Joints are simply the place where two bones connect. They are constructed to allow movement and provide mechanical support. Joints can be fibrous (joined by dense regular, collagen fibers), joined by cartilage (translucent somewhat elastic tissue), or the joint may include a synovial cavity to cushion movement, like your hip joint. Your pelvis holds some of the most powerful ligaments in your body: including your symphysis pubis (front of your pelvis), sacroiliac (connects your sacrum and ilium), and sacrospinous (links each pelvic bone to your sacrum and coccyx and maintains the length of your vagina).pelvic landmarks
Without muscles, both your pelvic and belly contents would fall out. They hold your bladder, vagina, uterus and rectum and your abdominal contents in place. Your pelvic muscles will become important in this book when we discuss one of the major reasons for surgical pelvic mesh: pelvic organ prolapse. Three muscles working together, your puborectalis, pubococcygeus, and iliecoccygeus muscles, create your pelvic floor (perineum) and resist any additional pressure (like when you cough) to keep your urine and stool in check. Two thick membranes cover and protect your pelvic muscles and become important when surgery involves cutting them: your parietal (wall) layer and your visceral (internal organ) layer, which is closer to your abdominal organs.


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

Join our FORUM to continue learning about surgical mesh.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

How to File Your Own Device Complaint to the FDA

printer logoHOW TO FILE YOUR OWN DEVICE COMPLAINT
TO THE FDA –
©Peggy Day

You oe aomeone you know has been hurt by a device. You want to let the FDA know about it, but it is so complicated. Here is a step-by-step guide.

This worksheet works best if you print out these pages and fill them in advance. (Click here for a printable copy)  You’ll be ready to make the best, most effective report you can in one sitting. Settle in with a cuppa tea or whatever relaxes you.

Now: click on this link:   https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/medwatch/index.cfm?action=consumer.reporting.home

The first page you should see should look like this:

FDA MEDWATCH FRONT 1

Go ahead and click on “Consumer/Patient.”

On the next page, check the box for medical device.

FDA MEDWATCH 2

 

Next, check everything that applies:

FDA MEDWATCH 3

Write every detail you know about the situation. Don’t hold back, this is the place to let your feelings flow. Don’t worry, you can always file a new report if new information or new details come to you.

FDA MEDWATCH 5

If you have any lab results or information you’d like to make public, add them here.

FDA MEDWATCH 6

Add the date of the event if you know it. (Very important!)

FDA MEDWATCH 7

Here is where you fill in as much information about the device as you know. If you have no idea what the device is, write as much as you do know or write: “Unknown pelvic sling,” “Unknown hernia mesh,” etc. Do your best.

FDA MEDWATCH 8

FDA MEDWATCH 9

Some of the following information will be made available to others. You decide what you want to share.

FDA MEDWATCH 10

FDA MEDWATCH 11

FDA MEDWATCH 12

The following is information to identify the reporter (you). The more information you offer, the more credible your report will be.

FDA MEDWATCH 13

Should you decide to check the box below, be prepared to be contacted by the manufacturer of the device. Remember, their job is to protect the company, not to ensure or provide the best patient care.

FDA MEDWATCH 14

©Peggy Day





22+ Crucial Questions to Ask Surgeon Before Mesh Surgery

 1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

 2. Why is the operation necessary?

 3. I am aware that a bladder sling or hernia mesh is made of polypropylene and the material is the same, whether it is called a “tape” or “minitape.” I do not want polypropylene in my body. Are you willing to do the surgery without the use of synthetic surgical mesh? {__ I am allergic to polypropylene (check if applies to you).}

4. What are my alternatives to this procedure? (for example: I am aware the Burch Procedure has the same rate of success as synthetic surgical mesh. Are you able to do an alternative procedure)

 5. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will those benefits last?

 6. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

 7. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

 8. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

9. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology, Urogynecology, Gynecology, General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery?  Other?

10. Where will my surgery be performed?

11. How long will my operation take?

12. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

13. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

14. Do you have to cut close to larger nerves to complete this operation?

15. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

16. What is the risk of mesh erosion into healthy organs from this surgery?

17. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide antibiotic prophylaxis?

18. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

19. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

20. What can I expect during recovery?

21. How will my life be changed for the good or bad after this operation?

22. How many future surgeries might I expect after this surgery if there are complications?

Added question: Are you planning to have a salesmen in the operating room with you? I do__ do not___ prefer to have a sales representative in the OR with me.

(Click here for download of copy with fill-in-the-blanks.)


 

 POLY IS FOR ADA RAMPS


 

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current. Example here.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

From PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com                        © Peggy Day November 27, 2015





26 Pelvic Mesh Complications Your Doc Never Mentioned

Welcome to the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide! This page is like a Table of Contents.

Over 4.2 million women have the implants and a quarter to a third of them suffer debilitating complications while doctors say, “It’s not the mesh.” The FDA warned in both 2008 and 2011 that complications are serious. Too many women are finding out they were right all along, it is the mesh. 

If you’re having trouble with mesh, here is a list of 26 complications in the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Sign up for updates to learn more and take the first step on your healing journey.

POLY IS FOR CABLES copy

26 Mesh Complications Your Doctor Never Warned You About:

1) Intractable Pain (pain that doesn’t go away) – Some people wake up from implant surgery knowing something is wrong. It is too tight or the pain is beyond measuring. Part 1 talks about the post operative pain from pelvic mesh & Part 2 is one woman’s journey with pelvic mesh pain.

2) Excessive BleedingBleeding happens but when is it too much? When to call the doctor? How to regain strength after heavy bleeding

3) Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection – Urinary tract infections are serious health-risks and can involve the bladder and kidney. When mesh is stuck in the bladder it continually irritates the bladder until it is removed surgically. Learn how to prevent UTIs and test yourself at home and to distinguish a bladder infection from a kidney infection.

     4) Wound infectionsA bladder sling can act like a petri dish harboring and incubating strong, sometimes drug-resistant bacteria. Left undiagnosed, they can lead to a delay in wound healing, even open up wide and deep surgical wounds and putting your life at risk.

5) Bladder injuryA slip of the knife, a puncture from an ice-pick like trocar, sling pulled so tight that it cuts the bladder. A bladder injury is one of the most difficult to repair. One study says it happens 10% of the time, another say 75%!

6) Bowel InjuryWhen a part of the bowel is nicked, fecal matter seeps into the interior of the body, when it the diagnosis is delayed or completely missed, patients become extremely ill.

7) Fistula (a hole between two organs) – Imagine your urine draining out of your vagina or your stool coming out. Fistula is all to common and deeply embarrassing for women.

8) Wound Opening Up After Stitches(also called dehiscence) – You think your surgery is healing and you are trying to get back on your feet and back to normal. Then your wound starts to open up. Dehiscence delays healing for a very long time.

9) Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion) As many as one patient in three experiences erosion from mesh. Would you agree to mesh if you were told the odds that you wouldn’t enjoy sex ever again were one in three?

10) Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”The odds that mesh surgery won’t cure your incontinence is the same as other surgical repairs: one in three.

11) Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”A mesh that is implanted too tight can slow down or stop your urine stream for about four percent of patients. Why does your surgeons “handedness” (right- or left-handed) affect your outcome?

12) Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse One study found 26% of women found sex too painful after mesh surgery.

13) Multiple surgeriesWhen things go wrong, often the solution is another surgery and another. Some women have had over a dozen surgeries to correct mesh complications. More surgery = more scarring.

14) Vaginal scarring/shrinkage – Vaginal scarring: one of the most emotionally and physically difficult problems to heal.

15) Emotional DamageNaturally, an injury to a woman’s re-creative center causes emotional pain but can we allow doctors to blame the women?

16) Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damageStinging, burning, pins-and-needles, numbness all are signs of nerve damage. Even the way your body was positioned during surgery can cause nerve damage.

17) Obturator Nerve – Symptoms in your mid-thighs (saddle region).

18) Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric Nerve – Symptoms in your pubic region.

19) Genitofemoral Nerve – Symptoms in your inner groin.

20) Femoral Nerve – Symptoms in your outer thighs

21) Pudendal Nerve Entrapment – Symptoms in your “sit spot.”

22) Fibular Neuropathy – Symptoms on the outside lower legs

23) Saphenous Nerve – Symptoms on your inner lower legs

24) Piriformis Syndrome – Symptoms across your buttocks.

25) Sciatica – Symptoms all the way down your leg.

26) Peripheral Neuropathy – Symptoms from the bottom of your feet and up your legs, even your hands can be involved.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 2


If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

The Pelvis in Flames – Autoimmune Diseases and Pelvic Mesh

Why does one woman instantly react to a plastic mesh implant and another not even notice it, at least for several years? Every body reacts to the polypropylene mesh because the mesh is biologically incompatible with human tissue. The level of bio-incompatibility  “determines the host’s inflammatory response, scar plate formation, tissue ingrowth, and subsequent mesh performance, including prosthetic compliance.” It may be a decade or so before some women experience rejection symptoms: the burning, constant gnawing like there is a fire inside, debilitating damage, erosions, infections, urinary troubles and more, because as the body changes as it ages.

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 7.44.56 AM

Polypropylene mesh was designed to provoke a chronic inflammatory response that varies from woman to woman; from mild to severe. The minute the synthetic mesh came in contact with your healthy tissue, the fire started. Your body’s immune response recognizes non-native citizens like bacteria, viruses, and toxins, a splinter, foreign substances, or a synthetic mesh implant and responds to antigens (proteins attached to the surface of cells, viruses, or bacteria) by initiating a fierce defense. However, no matter how much your body tries to reject the plastic mesh implant, it can’t because it is trapped in the structures of your pelvis.

Eventually your healthy immune response may become compromised and give way to autoimmune disease. Those same antibodies that are charged with protecting your body from foreign matter may begin to attack your body’s own proteins and tissues, thinking they are foreign. Although the problem in autoimmune disorders is the immune system, the symptoms are displayed by the organ that is under attack. Essentially, autoimmune disease is an immune system with gone wild and turning on itself.

MESH IF FOR FOODpolypropylene NETONROLL

In the general population autoimmune disorders predominantly affect women and about three percent of the general population. More research is need to to determine how many mesh recipients have developed autoimmune diseases but, anecdotally, mesh victims who gather on the internet in groups of between 200 and a thousand participants connect the onset of an autoimmune process to the date of their mesh implant. Once a patient develops one autoimmune condition, the odds of developing another are greatly increased. Research about one autoimmune disease, Celiac Disease, showed that maintaining a gluten-free diet will dramatically reduce the number of antibodies in an affected child’s body. We recommend more research to determine if complete mesh removal will improve autoimmune symptoms.

Below is a list of autoimmune diseases found in the anecdotes of pelvic mesh owners:

Screen Shot 2015-08-18 at 4.24.38 PM

Do you have an autoimmune disease after a mesh transplant? What do you think?


If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.