Tag Archives: nerve damage

10 Facts of Life for the Pelvic Mesh Newbie

  1. Mesh injuries and illness rates are much higher than medical studies show. Most published research favorable to mesh is funded by the manufacturer.
  2. Mesh is mesh. There is no “old mesh.” It is all that same thing with minor changes in shape or route. Polypropylene is just plain damaging to human tissue.
  3. The pelvis is a perilous place to conduct surgery. Even human or pig mesh or simple suture repairs can cause problems–but not as frequently as pelvic mesh.
  4. Your new pelvic problem is very likely caused by the mesh itself. Fearing litigation and believing the manufacturer’s advertising, doctors are reluctant to blame the device.
  5. Some pain and infection get better with removal–but not all.

    KIM Mesh

  6. Very few surgeons know how to take mesh out, so they fake it with partial revision surgeries that lead to new complications and more surgeries. More surgeries = more scar tissue.
  7. There is no justice. There are almost no medical malpractice lawsuits anymore. There is no money in malpractice litigation for the lawyers since “Tort Reform” was enacted in all 50 states. Doctors and the AMA lobbied and paid for Tort Reform.
  8. About class actions, there is no money for a lawyer who represents a patient with pain, infection, nerve damage, etc. because recent settlements are based on the number of surgeries you’ve had and not how sick or injured you are.
  9. Don’t wait for legal recourse before finding a competent surgeon. Consider crowd-funding to get well.
  10. You shouldn’t have to do this alone. Join a mesh support group but keep a critical mind and don’t accept advice just because another person is adamant in their post Be careful. Be sure to double check any answers you receive. A good internet search can provide your best education.

 


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Pudendal Nerve Injury Caused by Improper Insertion of TOT Obturator Tape – Pelvic Pain

The two main nerve complications TOT-injured women report in support groups are 1) pudendal and 2) obturator in that order. Because most studies do not evaluate for nerve injuries past 3-12 months, there is no scientific estimate of how common the injury is. Our experience is that it is extremely common. Pudendal injury causes persistent pain localized around the urethra and around the clitoris, irradiating to the one labia majora (maximum at the lower edge of symphysis) or both.

Polypropylene creates cripples when placed inside the pelvis.

The pudendal nerve is nowhere near the pathway of an obturator tape so how did the women get injured? The mystery may have been solved by three Czech investigators.

In 2011, Jaromir Masata & Petr Hubka & Alois Martan decided to look into why their patient, a 48 years old female obtained a pudendal nerve injury. After receiving a TVT-O, the woman experienced what the authors saw as an “atypical” postoperative pain that continued without relief for three years. While the authors treated her with injections and replaced her sling with yet another dubious tape, the work they did to track down the cause of her injury is valuable.

Authors circled scar and placed a “+” pointing to correct placement location.

The woman’s insertion scar (see Figure 1) was in the wrong place. By using a cadaver to trace the aberrant passage of her sling, the researchers found it intersected with the pudendal nerve. How many others were injured this way? Are you one of them? Was your transobturator tape placed incorrectly? If the manufacturer provided short videos and an instruction sheet, was that adequate training for your surgeon?

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    • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at

daywriter1@gmail.com

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Partial Pelvic Mesh Removal — Wrong Solution to Permanent Problem

Your surgeon says he or she can snip the part of the mesh sling they can see, a quick operation and you’ll be better. Or says he can cut it to release it because it was put in too tight. Or, he promises a full removal but the operation takes less than an hour and, if the parts go to pathology, most of the mesh is still not accounted for.

Women who knowingly or unknowingly have partial removal surgery come to regret it. They issue strong warnings for the lucky women who read or search for answers online before signing up for a partial removal. Thousands of Urogynecologists and Urologists do partial removals. The very people who profit from mesh tell those specialists how to handle complaints: just cut a little out. Some heartless doctors cut it right there in the office with no anesthesia whatsoever.

The woman who have been through this tell newcomers not to allow a surgeon to cut bits and pieces of mesh but to leave it whole for a qualified surgeon with the skills to necessary to remove the entire device in one operation. They warn that doctors are not telling the truth about those partial surgeries.

Frayed rope is like sliced mesh

Partial removal can be a temporary solution to a permanent problem. Nearly everyone gets temporary relief after a partial surgery. When a rope breaks, the ends fray. That’s what happens with partials. All the ends leak toxic chemicals, stirring up a immune storm inside your body and spring back, eventually attaching to other parts of your vagina, bladder, intestines, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. After a year or two, you develop new symptoms and go looking for a doctor who can help. More than 99% of board certified surgeons will do another partial. Some women have dozens of surgeries before finding help from advocacy groups.

Be very careful. Get the whole thing out in any way you can because you are in the best possible shape to have a good outcome when your surgeon goes after the whole thing and it’s still intact! When mesh is cut, the next surgeon must go searching for shreds of it. They compare that surgery to trying to get bubble gum out of hair or searching for shrapnel.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

If your surgery took less than four hours, consider that it may not be a complete removal, get your medical and surgical records and your pathology report. Learn the dimensions of your implant and ask for an accounting for every piece of it. Before your explant surgery, demand a micro and macro pathology be done. Afterward, get those reports!

We’ve found only five surgeons in the U.S. who consistently prove they removed complete pelvic mesh including arms or anchors (fixation devices):

  • Shlomo Raz, UCLA
  • Dionysis Veronikis, St. Louis, MO
  • Una Lee, Seattle WA
  • Dmitriy Nikolavsky, Syracuse, NY
  • Michael Hibner, Phoenix, AZ

The surgery is very risky but research has shown that is in no more risky that partial removals.

Beware of sugeons loan companies Beware of Mesh News
If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.
PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.





22+ Crucial Questions to Ask Surgeon Before Mesh Surgery

 1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

 2. Why is the operation necessary?

 3. I am aware that a bladder sling or hernia mesh is made of polypropylene and the material is the same, whether it is called a “tape” or “minitape.” I do not want polypropylene in my body. Are you willing to do the surgery without the use of synthetic surgical mesh? {__ I am allergic to polypropylene (check if applies to you).}

4. What are my alternatives to this procedure? (for example: I am aware the Burch Procedure has the same rate of success as synthetic surgical mesh. Are you able to do an alternative procedure)

 5. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will those benefits last?

 6. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

 7. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

 8. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

9. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology, Urogynecology, Gynecology, General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery?  Other?

10. Where will my surgery be performed?

11. How long will my operation take?

12. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

13. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

14. Do you have to cut close to larger nerves to complete this operation?

15. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

16. What is the risk of mesh erosion into healthy organs from this surgery?

17. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide antibiotic prophylaxis?

18. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

19. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

20. What can I expect during recovery?

21. How will my life be changed for the good or bad after this operation?

22. How many future surgeries might I expect after this surgery if there are complications?

Added question: Are you planning to have a salesmen in the operating room with you? I do__ do not___ prefer to have a sales representative in the OR with me.

(Click here for download of copy with fill-in-the-blanks.)


 

 POLY IS FOR ADA RAMPS


 

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current. Example here.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

From PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com                        © Peggy Day November 27, 2015





25 Crucial Questions to Ask Your Mesh Removal Surgeon

1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

2. Why is the operation necessary?

3. What are my alternatives to this procedure?

4. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will the benefits last?

5. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

6. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

7. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

8. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology  Urogynecology  Gynecology √ General Surgery  Colorectal Surgery?  None Other 

9. Where will surgery be performed?

10. How long will my operation take?

11. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

12. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

13. If mesh is embedded in my bladder or urethra, do you have the skills to take it out?

14. If mesh is embedded into my obturator spaces, do you have the skills to take it out?

15. If mesh has eroded into my colon or rectum, do you have the skills to take it out?

16. If I have more than one mesh, do you have the skills to find it and take it out?

17. If mesh is close to a blood vessel, do you have the skills to remove it?

18. If mesh is close to a large nerve, do you have the skills to remove it with the least amount of damage?

 19. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

 20. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide prophylaxis to address biofilm-related infections?

21. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

22. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

23. What can I expect during recovery?

24. What are the ways will my life be different after this surgical procedure?

25. How many future surgeries should I expect?

(Click HERE for Printable Version with Fill in the Blanks.)


Mesh is not for bodies in motion

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon. Example here.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

 


 

  • If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here. Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.


26 Pelvic Mesh Complications Your Doc Never Mentioned

Welcome to the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide! This page is like a Table of Contents.

Over 4.2 million women have the implants and a quarter to a third of them suffer debilitating complications while doctors say, “It’s not the mesh.” The FDA warned in both 2008 and 2011 that complications are serious. Too many women are finding out they were right all along, it is the mesh. 

If you’re having trouble with mesh, here is a list of 26 complications in the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Sign up for updates to learn more and take the first step on your healing journey.

POLY IS FOR CABLES copy

26 Mesh Complications Your Doctor Never Warned You About:

1) Intractable Pain (pain that doesn’t go away) – Some people wake up from implant surgery knowing something is wrong. It is too tight or the pain is beyond measuring. Part 1 talks about the post operative pain from pelvic mesh & Part 2 is one woman’s journey with pelvic mesh pain.

2) Excessive BleedingBleeding happens but when is it too much? When to call the doctor? How to regain strength after heavy bleeding

3) Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection – Urinary tract infections are serious health-risks and can involve the bladder and kidney. When mesh is stuck in the bladder it continually irritates the bladder until it is removed surgically. Learn how to prevent UTIs and test yourself at home and to distinguish a bladder infection from a kidney infection.

     4) Wound infectionsA bladder sling can act like a petri dish harboring and incubating strong, sometimes drug-resistant bacteria. Left undiagnosed, they can lead to a delay in wound healing, even open up wide and deep surgical wounds and putting your life at risk.

5) Bladder injuryA slip of the knife, a puncture from an ice-pick like trocar, sling pulled so tight that it cuts the bladder. A bladder injury is one of the most difficult to repair. One study says it happens 10% of the time, another say 75%!

6) Bowel InjuryWhen a part of the bowel is nicked, fecal matter seeps into the interior of the body, when it the diagnosis is delayed or completely missed, patients become extremely ill.

7) Fistula (a hole between two organs) – Imagine your urine draining out of your vagina or your stool coming out. Fistula is all to common and deeply embarrassing for women.

8) Wound Opening Up After Stitches(also called dehiscence) – You think your surgery is healing and you are trying to get back on your feet and back to normal. Then your wound starts to open up. Dehiscence delays healing for a very long time.

9) Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion) As many as one patient in three experiences erosion from mesh. Would you agree to mesh if you were told the odds that you wouldn’t enjoy sex ever again were one in three?

10) Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”The odds that mesh surgery won’t cure your incontinence is the same as other surgical repairs: one in three.

11) Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”A mesh that is implanted too tight can slow down or stop your urine stream for about four percent of patients. Why does your surgeons “handedness” (right- or left-handed) affect your outcome?

12) Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse One study found 26% of women found sex too painful after mesh surgery.

13) Multiple surgeriesWhen things go wrong, often the solution is another surgery and another. Some women have had over a dozen surgeries to correct mesh complications. More surgery = more scarring.

14) Vaginal scarring/shrinkage – Vaginal scarring: one of the most emotionally and physically difficult problems to heal.

15) Emotional DamageNaturally, an injury to a woman’s re-creative center causes emotional pain but can we allow doctors to blame the women?

16) Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damageStinging, burning, pins-and-needles, numbness all are signs of nerve damage. Even the way your body was positioned during surgery can cause nerve damage.

17) Obturator Nerve – Symptoms in your mid-thighs (saddle region).

18) Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric Nerve – Symptoms in your pubic region.

19) Genitofemoral Nerve – Symptoms in your inner groin.

20) Femoral Nerve – Symptoms in your outer thighs

21) Pudendal Nerve Entrapment – Symptoms in your “sit spot.”

22) Fibular Neuropathy – Symptoms on the outside lower legs

23) Saphenous Nerve – Symptoms on your inner lower legs

24) Piriformis Syndrome – Symptoms across your buttocks.

25) Sciatica – Symptoms all the way down your leg.

26) Peripheral Neuropathy – Symptoms from the bottom of your feet and up your legs, even your hands can be involved.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 2


If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Handling a Trip To The Emergency Room With Mesh Trouble

Once upon a time, a more experienced emergency room nurse told me that doctors are bad with headache and backache patients because they can’t see the pain like they can see a broken arm or a heart attack. It is infinitely more rewarding for an ER doctor to put a cast on an arm or order the best medication to stop a heart attack in its tracks than to give a shot to a pain sufferer who will softly murmur a thank you, wrap herself in her blanket, and walk out the door with her head down and her husband carrying her discharge papers and her purse.

Just remember—when you are about fantasizing recreating Shirley MacLaine’s hospital scene, and screaming “GIVE HER THE SHOT!” at the nurse, your nurse is probably fantasizing about reenacting Jerry Maguire’s quitting scene.

POLY IS FOR EMERGENCY EXITS

Here are my thoughts to help you have a successful ER visit.

 

 

In a successful ER visit:
◆    You are treated in a timely manner with respect to circumstances
◆    You are treated with respect
⁃    Your privacy is respected
⁃    You are kept comfortable
⁃    All team members speak to with you as an equal participant in your care

◆    Staff:
⁃    Addresses your problem
⁃    Offers a correct and thorough diagnosis
⁃    Gives you appropriate treatment
⁃    Gives you enough treatment to get you through to your next doctor visit

Now, here are a few suggestions to help you get the best out of your ER visit:
◆    Expect to wait
⁃    The ER uses a system of priorities that is very similar to Mazlow’s Hierarchy with your ability to get air at the bottom platform of the pyramid. Next come your heart beat and circulation, and on and on…
◆    Make yourself personable

⁃    Be honest & don’t exaggerate. Triage nurses have seen a lot of people in pain and a lot of injuries and illnesses and have a natural instinct for dramatic behavior. If they cannot see your pain or injury, help them understand it. Try describing it with commonly understood details.
⁃    Ask for the help that you need. Explain why you are there and what you expect as an outcome of your visit. For example, say, “I have a plan to see my doctor in five days but I need pain medication to get me through until then.”
⁃    If you feel you are being demeaned or talked down to, turn it around without sarcasm and ask the doctor what he recommends you could do or what he might do in the same situation. If you are out and out mistreated, ask for another physician (or nurse).
⁃    If you have an expectation when you arrive that you will be mistreated, check it at the door. Don’t start by saying, “I have pelvic mesh and I am part of a lawsuit.” Those are toxic words to a team that is practicing defensive medicine— which is what all ER’s do.
maslows-hierarchy-of-needs

I found another blogger,  unnamed, who addressed the topic, “ER visits” for chronic pain sufferers. I’ve abbreviated a few of her suggestions:
◆    The emergency room is the last resort after trying every solution at home and calling your doctor or patient care team or going to an Urgent Care center.
◆    Make sure you have a regular physician or primary care doctor who manages your care.
⁃    Look at local and even national support groups for your condition(s). They will have lists of hospitals and even specific doctors in your area who have been a good match for others in your situation. If those doctors are not taking patients, ask their staff whom they would recommend.
◆    Be ready to show them that you tried to contact your regular doctor before going to the ER
⁃    The ER is more sympathetic to the patient who has been told to go the ER by his doctor or his team.
⁃    It makes it clear you are only using the ER as a last resort.
⁃    Bring a letter from your doctor or your most recent discharge papers from your doctor. Also, bring a copy of your pain plan if you have a pain management doctor.
◆    Bring a list of medications rather than rely on your own memory.
◆    Work cooperatively with the ER staff and don’t call negative attention to yourself. You may be in agonizing pain but the staff is first deciding whether you are exhibiting “drug seeking behavior,” so don’t give them any opportunity to decide wrong.
◆    If you have a rare condition or one that is frequently misunderstood or is thought not to cause pain, bring information about your condition. (I can’t tell you how many times people did that when I worked in the ER. We were grateful not to have to look it up.)
◆    Bring someone with you. This will help because it is hard to explain things when you are sick or in pain and they can help. They also can remember details for you.
◆    If possible, use the same ER as much as possible because doctors become suspicious when they discover visits to multiple hospitals (Hint: They call each other to say so!)
◆    Keep a folder handy with all your details written down so you don’t have to try to put it together in the midst of horrific pain.

Finally, if you feel you’ve been mistreated after your ER visit, please do at least three of these things:
◆    Write your story down.
◆    Contact the Medical Director of the ER during business hours.
◆    Contact the Medical Director of the hospital during business hours.
◆    Contact the Board of Medical Examiners or licensing bureau for your state.
◆    Send your description of your visit, by snail mail letter to each of the people above and include a letter to the offending doctor as well. Who knows? He may see the light.
◆    One final note, after you are treated well, drop a short note to the ER and you can be sure it will be given to your doctor!!

Have you been treated well or badly by an ER? What’s your take?

Screen Shot 2015-08-23 at 4.30.12 PM

Published under Fair Use Act as Educational


 

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

 

The Pelvis in Flames – Autoimmune Diseases and Pelvic Mesh

Why does one woman instantly react to a plastic mesh implant and another not even notice it, at least for several years? Every body reacts to the polypropylene mesh because the mesh is biologically incompatible with human tissue. The level of bio-incompatibility  “determines the host’s inflammatory response, scar plate formation, tissue ingrowth, and subsequent mesh performance, including prosthetic compliance.” It may be a decade or so before some women experience rejection symptoms: the burning, constant gnawing like there is a fire inside, debilitating damage, erosions, infections, urinary troubles and more, because as the body changes as it ages.

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 7.44.56 AM

Polypropylene mesh was designed to provoke a chronic inflammatory response that varies from woman to woman; from mild to severe. The minute the synthetic mesh came in contact with your healthy tissue, the fire started. Your body’s immune response recognizes non-native citizens like bacteria, viruses, and toxins, a splinter, foreign substances, or a synthetic mesh implant and responds to antigens (proteins attached to the surface of cells, viruses, or bacteria) by initiating a fierce defense. However, no matter how much your body tries to reject the plastic mesh implant, it can’t because it is trapped in the structures of your pelvis.

Eventually your healthy immune response may become compromised and give way to autoimmune disease. Those same antibodies that are charged with protecting your body from foreign matter may begin to attack your body’s own proteins and tissues, thinking they are foreign. Although the problem in autoimmune disorders is the immune system, the symptoms are displayed by the organ that is under attack. Essentially, autoimmune disease is an immune system with gone wild and turning on itself.

MESH IF FOR FOODpolypropylene NETONROLL

In the general population autoimmune disorders predominantly affect women and about three percent of the general population. More research is need to to determine how many mesh recipients have developed autoimmune diseases but, anecdotally, mesh victims who gather on the internet in groups of between 200 and a thousand participants connect the onset of an autoimmune process to the date of their mesh implant. Once a patient develops one autoimmune condition, the odds of developing another are greatly increased. Research about one autoimmune disease, Celiac Disease, showed that maintaining a gluten-free diet will dramatically reduce the number of antibodies in an affected child’s body. We recommend more research to determine if complete mesh removal will improve autoimmune symptoms.

Below is a list of autoimmune diseases found in the anecdotes of pelvic mesh owners:

Screen Shot 2015-08-18 at 4.24.38 PM

Do you have an autoimmune disease after a mesh transplant? What do you think?


If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Burning Feet – Another Mesh Trouble

Some people express some surprise that even nurses have fallen for the doctor’s explanation that they should have a pelvic mesh implant, thinking that nurses would have done more diligent research. Nurses were trained to believe that all of the drugs and all of the devices they used had been carefully studied and approved. (Note: none of it was ever approved, it was “cleared.”) In most cases, only after being injured themselves, do they begin to do the careful research. One such nurse wrote this about peripheral neuropathy:

 “I have found that neuropathy is fairly common with mesh patients. Yes, the vagina is considered contaminated, so the surgery is considered ‘clean contaminated’ surgery. The real problem is that these implants should have never been implanted in a contaminated area.
“I kept telling my neurologist that my pelvis and feet and legs are connected. I can go into detail about why my theory we develop neuropathy makes sense to me.
“My theory is that all the nerves in the pelvis—part of the sacral nerves and L4-5 from the sciatic nerve (are involved). Because of severe inflammation, and foreign body response and mesh pulling on the nerves, we develop neuropathy. The gynecologist I am seeing here in Charlotte confirmed what I thought: that the pain we have from the pudendal nerve and the neuropathy in our feet and legs are related.
“The caudal epidurals stopped the pain and tingling, I can have another in August, I still feel some low level tinging and burning, but nothing like it was. The nurses told me they are treating other mesh patients with the same symptoms I have.
NervousSystem PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY SHADING
Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage to the nerves to your arms, hands, legs and feet—your periphery. The pain can be felt as tingling, burning, or feeling like you are wearing a stocking or glove. Some say ‘pins and needles,” others that their feet are on fire. More than a hundred types of peripheral neuropathy have been identified. Today’s blog is an overview—look for more about this soon from Mesh Troubles. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) after mesh surgery can be related to many causes.

Here are just some things that cause peripheral neuropathy:

•    Vitamin deficiencies
⁃    Alcoholism
•    Hormonal deficiencies
•    Autoimmune diseases
⁃    Diabetes mellitis
⁃    Lupus
⁃    Rheumatoid arthritis
⁃    Guillain-Barre syndrome
•    Compression above area with symptoms
•    Exposure to poisons
⁃    Heavy metals
⁃    Medications
•    Infections
⁃    Viral or bacterial infections
⁃    Lyme Disease
⁃    Shingles
⁃    Epstein-Barr
⁃    Hep C
⁃    HIV/AIDS
•    Inherited disorders
⁃    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
⁃    Amyloid polyneuropathy

There are three different kinds of nerves that can be affected by PN: sensory nerves that receive sensations such as heat, pain, or touch; motor nerves that control how you muscles move; and autonomic nerves that control functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, digestion and bladder function.
Peripheral neuropathy w foot drop copy
Symptoms:
◦    Gradual onset of numbness and tingling in your feet or hands which may move upward into your legs or arms
◦    Burning pain in affect areas
◦    Sharp, jabbing or electric-like pain
◦    Areas sensitive to touch
◦    Lack of coordination
◦    Muscle weakness or paralysis (motor nerves)
◦    Bowel or bladder problems (autonomic nerves)
Peripheral neuralgia may affect one nerve or more, one area or several different areas.
Treatments: First the good news. Correcting the underlying problem may heal PN. “Peripheral nerves have the ability to regenerate axons, as long as the nerve cell itself has not died, which may lead to functional recovery over time. Correcting an underlying condition often can result in the neuropathy resolving on its own as the nerves recover or regenerate.”

Self-care including maintaining optimal weight, exercise to reduce cramps and improve muscle strength and prevent muscle wasting, a healthy diet to correct vitamin deficiencies an minimize or eliminate sugar intake, limiting alcohol and exposure to toxins and medications, treatment of injuries, stopping smoking to improve circulation, meticulous care of your feet including visualizing them frequently can improve your symptoms.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen can help milder cases and narcotic medications may be effective. There are some creams or ointments like Llidocaine or Capsaicin may help.

A “TENS unit” (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation)  can provide pain relief for some people. The therapy involves attaching electrodes to your skin at the site of your pain or near associated nerves and then administering a gentle electrical current. TENS has been shown in some studies to help diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

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Sometimes hand or foot braces or orthopedic shoes help reduce pain or prevent injuries. Acupuncture, massage, and herbal medications help as well. Surgically, releasing a nerve can improve compressions injuries when a single nerve is involved.

Your physician may prescribe antidepressants but we recommend caution with those types of medication because one of the most common side-effects of antidepressants is neuropathy. Recently, anti-convulsant medications have been used to control the pain but  they are fraught with side-effects that are worse than the initial problems.

The very same process that was used to clear (mind you, they never say “approve”) plastic mesh to be irretrievably placed inside your body, is the one that cleared the drugs to be prescribed for nerve pain. The list of side-effects from these drugs (here is one example) is enough to make you run for the hills, yet they are routinely prescribed for peripheral neuropathy—some of them even cause PN! It makes no sense to me. Does it to you? You are the one who has to live with long-term effects for the rest of your life. Not the doctor you saw for fifteen minutes. What you you think about it? Isn’t your life is too valuable to risk taking a medication, like Paxil, that causes you to have suicidal thoughts in the middle of struggling with the devastating consequences of synthetic surgical mesh?

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Please, No Fibbing About Fibular Neuropathy

I have lower my head and confess that I used to be confused about the peroneal nerve: today’s mesh trouble. Okay, I thought it affected the perineum. You know what they say about making assumptions, right? Makes a gluteus maximus out of “u” and “me.” Okay, here’s the truth: the pudendal nerve serves the perineum and the peroneal nerve served the lower, outer leg and foot but, that’s not completely true any more. In 1998 scientists decided to change the name of the nerve to the fibular nerve and thought that should clear things up, right? Well, no. The scientists didn’t count on all the old doctors who were forgetting the new name and still calling it the peroneal nerve. For today’s blog, I’ll call it the fibular nerve.

Isn’t that what this blog is all about? Taking a close look at confusing and contradictory things that the medical profession says and sorting them out a bit so you can know what to do next?

Fibular nerve injury

Your common fibular nerve is a division of your sciatic nerve which travels near the outside of your biceps muscle to the outer side of your knee and then branches to the side of you lower leg before entering your toes. The nerve gives off branches along its way. The nerve can be injured at any level during surgery, or due to trauma or stretching.

In most cases, fibular nerve neuropathy, or fibular neuropathy, causes weakness in your ankle, trouble when you try to lift up your toes (dorsiflexion) as well as “foot drop.” Fibular nerve problems can create changes in sensation and movement to the outside surface of your foot and ankle as well as your outer three toes. One woman with fibular sensory changes said she felt like there was a blanket over the bottom of her leg all the time.

Fibular neuropathy is often misdiagnosed as sciatica, other nerve problems or systemic diseases. The most common injury causing fibular neuropathy is trauma, stretching, or compression at the top of your fibula (lower leg bone).
Diagnosing fibular nerve damage includes carefully listening to your description  of your symptoms, discussion of your past medical problems, and physical and neurological exams. Xray and MRI help narrow down the diagnosis but the most reliable diagnostic tool is the electromyogram because specific techniques can be used to determine how much recovery can be predicted for your particular injury.

Although there are many causes of Foot Drop, fibular nerve injury is the most frequent. Foot Drop is not itself a disease, but a symptom. Walking is a challenge with Foot Drop because you can’t control your ankle and you may develop a high-stepping gait in order to compensate. Some causes of Foot Drop are compression from a disc herniation, trauma to the sciatic nerve, bone fractures, crush-type injures, lacerations, among many others.

Symptoms:
•    Decreased sensation, numbness, or tingling in the top of your foot or the outer part of your upper or lower leg
•    Foot that drops (unable to hold your foot up)
•    “Slapping” gait (walking pattern in which each step makes a slapping noise)
•    Toes drag while walking
•    Walking problems
•    Weakness of the ankles or feet
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Treatment is determined by the cause of the fibular neuropathy. It is is due to compression, relief of the compression may involve surgery. Strengthening exercises can help improve function, stretching to maintain your ability to move your ankle in all directions can limit contractures. Orthotics, including a lateral wedge shoe insert can help. More complex surgeries include neurolysis, nerve repair and nerve and tendon transfers.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.