Tag Archives: Hernia mesh

Comprehensive List of Pelvic Mesh Products

Since the 1950’s, surgical mesh has been used for all types of internal repairs, particularly hernia repairs to strengthen the abdominal wall. In the 1970’s, gynecologist and urogynecologists began to develop and patent products which used surgical mesh to treat urinary incontinence (most often due to early bladder sagging) and later more pronounced pelvic organ prolapse. Gynecologists began to cut small pieces of hernia surgical mesh into precise shapes.

A company by the name of Versica Medical introduced a product called the “Vesica Bone Anchoring System”, which used sutures attached to small screws to urinary incontinence. Vesica’s system was one of the precursors to transvaginal mesh devices that followed, beginning with the ProteGen. 

Below is a comprehensive list of transvaginal (pelvic) mesh products. Expect this list to be updated with more information like dates of use soon.

American Medical System

  • Apogee
  • BioArc
  • Elevate
  • In-Fast Ultra Transvaginal Sling
  • MiniArc Precise Single Incision Sling
  • Monarc Subfascial Hammock
  • Perigee
  • SPARC Self-Fixating Sling System
  • Straight-In

Boston Scientific

  • Advantage Fit System
  • Advantage Sling System
  • Arise
  • Lynx Suprapubic Mid-Urethral Sling System
  • Obtryx Curved Single
  • Obtryx Mesh Sling
  • Pinnacle Pelvic Floor Repair Kit
  • Pinnacle Pelvic Floor Repair Kit II
  • Polyform Synthetic Mesh
  • Prefyx Mid U Mesh Sling System
  • Prefyx PPS System
  • Solyx SIS System
  • Uphold Vaginal Support System

Covidian

  • Duo
  • IVS Tunneler Intra-Vaginal Sling
  • IVS Tunneler Placement Device
  • Parietene Polypropylene Mesh
  • Surgipro Polyproylene Surgical Mesh

C.R. Bard

  • Align
  • Avaulta BioSynthetic Support System
  • Avaulta Plus BioSynthetic Support System
  • Avaulta Solo Support System
  • Avaulta Solo Synthetic Support System
  • CollaMend Implant
  • Faslata Allograft
  • Pelvicol Tissue
  • Pelvilace
  • PelviSoft Biomesh
  • Pelvitex Polypropylene Mesh
  • Ugytex
  • Ugytex Dual Knit Mesh
  • Uretex
  • Uretex TO
  • Uretex TOO2
  • Uretex TOO3

Coloplast (out of business)

  • Minitape
  • Omnisure
  • Smartmesh
  • Restorelle
  • T-Sling-Universal Polypropylene Sling System
  • Aris-Transobturator Sling System
  • Supris-Suprapubic Sling System

Cook Medical System (out of business)

  • Surgiss Biodesign Tension-Free Urethral Sling
  • Surgiss Biodesign Anterior Pelvic Floor Graft
  • Surgiss Biodesign Posterior Pelvic Floor Graft
  • Cook Urological Stratasis Tension-Free Urethral Sling.

Ethicon Division (Johnson & Johnson)

  • Prosima
  • Gynemesh PS
  • Prolene Polypropylene Mesh Patch Secur
  • Prolift
  • Prolift+M
  • Prosima
  • TVT
  • TVT Abbrevo
  • TVT Exact
  • TVT Obturator (TVT-0)
  • TVT Retropubic System
  • TVT Secur

Mentor Corporation

  • Obtape (recalled – was implanted between 2003 and 2006)

Other companies:

  • Caldera
  • Sofradim
  • Neomedic Sling

______________________________________________________

Early device, Perigee, with insertion tools. Note frayed ends of mesh.

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Specialized MRI and 3D Ultrasound See Mesh – CT Can’t

Too many surgeons are sending patients to have a CT (Cat Scan) and,  when the radiologist says he/she can’t see mesh, tell the patient the mesh must have disappeared or dissolved when a CT cannot identify mesh. Plastic mesh does not dissolve. Sadly too many patients have their pain disrespected or disregarded when the problem is the doctor’s. Only specialized 3D Ultrasound with the right technician and radiologist (more on this coming in another blog soon) and specialized MRI’s with the skills to see it and read it can identify mesh.
Here is a graphic, courtesy of www.scbtmr.org that you can print out an take to your doctor.

MRI to find mesh

How to see mesh with an MRI

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When We Need a Surgeon – Guest Post: Lars Aanning

Lars Aanning

I wrote this for the Yankton County Observer (20 April 2016):

When We Need A Surgeon

How we choose a surgeon depends on many factors, and some make more sense than others. For example, for most everyday procedures, such as removing the appendix or gallbladder, a well-trained community surgeon should be a safe bet. For more complex procedures, studies have consistently shown better results from surgeons working in hospitals where such procedures are done more often. A very talented surgeon working in a small community hospital may, in his/her own series, have even better or equivalent results, but such surgeons are the exception. Dr. Chet McVay was that exception and attracted patients from far and wide to South Dakota to have their hernias repaired. He was a meticulous surgeon who kept track of his patients and published his very successful results.

Complex operations, in general, have an increased likelihood of serious and lethal complications, whose diagnosis and successful intervention are more challenging to places that rarely do them. In fact, “failure to rescue” is new concept in healthcare that describes the ability of a hospital to “get it right” when “something goes wrong” and leads to better patient survival.

Bottom line: work closely with your physician to make sure you are referred to the right surgeon and the right place for your operation. Read up on your problem and become familiar with the medical terms. Being informed gives you a head start. Driving the distance easily trumps a life-changing disability. And, finally, ask your physician the question: “Doctor, is this the surgeon you would trust with your own health and that of your family?”


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about finding surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.




Why Not Talk About Hernia Mesh?

I often hear that people think that there is too much attention paid to pelvic mesh victims at the cost to the hernia victims. After all, it’s the same material that is used, just cut in a different shape and placed in a different part of the body. And, truth is, pelvic organ prolapse is very similar to a hernia —both are caused by a weakening of muscles.

When I planned this blog, I decided to focus on one type of mesh because it is the one I know best and because I planned to go into depth with my research. In the back of my mind, I want to do another blog called the Hernia Mesh Owner’s Guide —some day.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

I hope hernia sufferers will look at the parts of this blog that apply to them because so many complications are the same: the denial by doctors, the nerve injuries, the salesmen in the operating room, the body’s foreign body reaction and the resulting autoimmune diseases, the cancer risk, the pain, loss of consortium, and the loss of ability to work. The great difficulties getting it removed are similar. Mesh shreds, twists, curls, folds, stretches, migrates, disintegrates, etc. no matter where it is placed.

In looking at why the two entities got separated in the first place, it is important to look at the history of several legal battles. Hernia mesh underwent similar legal attacks about 20 years ago. Many versions of hernia were removed, recalled, and quietly taken off the market. Many people sued and won and many lost. In the end, really, the makers won. They just changed a few elements of hernia mesh, paid for scientific studies that proved it was a great product, and went right on marketing it (the same thing is happening with transvaginal mesh).

So, when the makers found a new application for mesh, putting it into women’s most private, most valued and most delicate place, it cause NEW problems because of the anatomy of the pelvis. The lawyers, like chairs on a tipping ship, rushed to represent this new disaster and abandoned the hernia meshes because there is no longer any money in those cases.

Hernia mesh victims: please be aware that not a single victim made this separation; it was done by lawyers.

Sadly, there are probably no lawyers who represent hernia mesh victims unless it involves malpractice and even that is very hard to prove. BigPharma and the AMA put legislation in place long ago to limit the amount you can win. (Tort reform only benefits those entities). BigPharma also controls much of major media. Thank goodness for social media!

 

Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.




22+ Crucial Questions to Ask Surgeon Before Mesh Surgery

 1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

 2. Why is the operation necessary?

 3. I am aware that a bladder sling or hernia mesh is made of polypropylene and the material is the same, whether it is called a “tape” or “minitape.” I do not want polypropylene in my body. Are you willing to do the surgery without the use of synthetic surgical mesh? {__ I am allergic to polypropylene (check if applies to you).}

4. What are my alternatives to this procedure? (for example: I am aware the Burch Procedure has the same rate of success as synthetic surgical mesh. Are you able to do an alternative procedure)

 5. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will those benefits last?

 6. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

 7. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

 8. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

9. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology, Urogynecology, Gynecology, General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery?  Other?

10. Where will my surgery be performed?

11. How long will my operation take?

12. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

13. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

14. Do you have to cut close to larger nerves to complete this operation?

15. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

16. What is the risk of mesh erosion into healthy organs from this surgery?

17. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide antibiotic prophylaxis?

18. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

19. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

20. What can I expect during recovery?

21. How will my life be changed for the good or bad after this operation?

22. How many future surgeries might I expect after this surgery if there are complications?

Added question: Are you planning to have a salesmen in the operating room with you? I do__ do not___ prefer to have a sales representative in the OR with me.

(Click here for download of copy with fill-in-the-blanks.)


 

 POLY IS FOR ADA RAMPS


 

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current. Example here.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

From PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com                        © Peggy Day November 27, 2015