Tag Archives: Dyspareunia

Childbirth Leads to Pelvic Organ Prolapse and Adult Incontinence. Here’s How

Mother Jones recently published an article that should be required reading for women suffering from pelvic organ prolapse.

“The list of ways in which the pelvis and reproductive organs can be damaged during this process is practically endless. Most women, as mentioned, experience at least some vaginal tearing. But in severe cases, the perineum—the area between the vagina and the anus—rips completely open (http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/labor-and-delivery/multimedia/vaginal-tears/sls- 20077129?s=5) , exposing the vagina to dangerous bacteria and leaving the mother unable to control her bowels. Sometimes, as in Claire’s case, the baby is too big to fit easily through the pelvis, and the infant’s head or shoulders can break the mother’s bones on the way out. In yet another harrowing scenario, a piece of the placenta remains stuck to the uterine wall after the baby is born, causing the woman to hemorrhage. If the pelvic floor muscles stretch too far during delivery, the uterus may sag into the vagina: prolapse. And even after a woman heals from her immediate injuries, she can experience chronic nerve pain, muscle spasms, or numbness for months or years. Plenty of women make it through a birth okay, only to suffer from incontinence or prolapse years or decades later, for reasons doctors still don’t understand.”
The Scary Truth About Childbirth | Mother Jones

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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26 Pelvic Mesh Complications Your Doc Never Mentioned

Welcome to the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide! This page is like a Table of Contents.

Over 4.2 million women have the implants and a quarter to a third of them suffer debilitating complications while doctors say, “It’s not the mesh.” The FDA warned in both 2008 and 2011 that complications are serious. Too many women are finding out they were right all along, it is the mesh. 

If you’re having trouble with mesh, here is a list of 26 complications in the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Sign up for updates to learn more and take the first step on your healing journey.

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26 Mesh Complications Your Doctor Never Warned You About:

1) Intractable Pain (pain that doesn’t go away) – Some people wake up from implant surgery knowing something is wrong. It is too tight or the pain is beyond measuring. Part 1 talks about the post operative pain from pelvic mesh & Part 2 is one woman’s journey with pelvic mesh pain.

2) Excessive BleedingBleeding happens but when is it too much? When to call the doctor? How to regain strength after heavy bleeding

3) Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection – Urinary tract infections are serious health-risks and can involve the bladder and kidney. When mesh is stuck in the bladder it continually irritates the bladder until it is removed surgically. Learn how to prevent UTIs and test yourself at home and to distinguish a bladder infection from a kidney infection.

     4) Wound infectionsA bladder sling can act like a petri dish harboring and incubating strong, sometimes drug-resistant bacteria. Left undiagnosed, they can lead to a delay in wound healing, even open up wide and deep surgical wounds and putting your life at risk.

5) Bladder injuryA slip of the knife, a puncture from an ice-pick like trocar, sling pulled so tight that it cuts the bladder. A bladder injury is one of the most difficult to repair. One study says it happens 10% of the time, another say 75%!

6) Bowel InjuryWhen a part of the bowel is nicked, fecal matter seeps into the interior of the body, when it the diagnosis is delayed or completely missed, patients become extremely ill.

7) Fistula (a hole between two organs) – Imagine your urine draining out of your vagina or your stool coming out. Fistula is all to common and deeply embarrassing for women.

8) Wound Opening Up After Stitches(also called dehiscence) – You think your surgery is healing and you are trying to get back on your feet and back to normal. Then your wound starts to open up. Dehiscence delays healing for a very long time.

9) Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion) As many as one patient in three experiences erosion from mesh. Would you agree to mesh if you were told the odds that you wouldn’t enjoy sex ever again were one in three?

10) Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”The odds that mesh surgery won’t cure your incontinence is the same as other surgical repairs: one in three.

11) Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”A mesh that is implanted too tight can slow down or stop your urine stream for about four percent of patients. Why does your surgeons “handedness” (right- or left-handed) affect your outcome?

12) Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse One study found 26% of women found sex too painful after mesh surgery.

13) Multiple surgeriesWhen things go wrong, often the solution is another surgery and another. Some women have had over a dozen surgeries to correct mesh complications. More surgery = more scarring.

14) Vaginal scarring/shrinkage – Vaginal scarring: one of the most emotionally and physically difficult problems to heal.

15) Emotional DamageNaturally, an injury to a woman’s re-creative center causes emotional pain but can we allow doctors to blame the women?

16) Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damageStinging, burning, pins-and-needles, numbness all are signs of nerve damage. Even the way your body was positioned during surgery can cause nerve damage.

17) Obturator Nerve – Symptoms in your mid-thighs (saddle region).

18) Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric Nerve – Symptoms in your pubic region.

19) Genitofemoral Nerve – Symptoms in your inner groin.

20) Femoral Nerve – Symptoms in your outer thighs

21) Pudendal Nerve Entrapment – Symptoms in your “sit spot.”

22) Fibular Neuropathy – Symptoms on the outside lower legs

23) Saphenous Nerve – Symptoms on your inner lower legs

24) Piriformis Syndrome – Symptoms across your buttocks.

25) Sciatica – Symptoms all the way down your leg.

26) Peripheral Neuropathy – Symptoms from the bottom of your feet and up your legs, even your hands can be involved.

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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Pelvic Mesh: Pelvic Pain, Part 2

“I heard a Nigerian-American woman, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, say in a speech, that Americans talk about pain differently from Nigerians. Americans, she said, have an expectation that pain can be anathema [something you absolutely cannot stand or you ban from your life]. In Nigeria, she said, pain is expected and nurses aren’t solicitous of patients who complain about it. It lead me to think about how my own journey with pelvic pain has changed my expectations about pain.

“Starting out, using narcotics was out of the question for me by the time I was implanted with a bladder sling. I had some very bad reactions to them and a duodenal ulcer meant that all NSAIDs [non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs] were out. I was left with Tylenol at the same time when warnings about  liver and kidneys damage came out. I tried physical therapy but one visit was enough to send me running for the hills–it was not for me.

“I saw a Psychologist/Pain Specialist who did not prescribe medication but who taught me not to let my mind run from the pain but to turn into it and pay attention to it. He said to learn about its qualities, locations, movements, and what made it better and what made it worse. Doing this was extremely difficult because I was changing a lifetime of attitudes about pain. It took a few months but having someone to report my discoveries about my pain to really helped. I learned there was one position I could put my body into that eased the pain up a bit and discovered that just knowing I could get into it helped me. Unfortunately, the only position that worked was in deep water so I had to wait until I found a pool to get into it. I have get into the water, lay on my back, drop one leg down and let the other stay floating near the surface. Afterward I did a few very slow and gentle stretches in the water. This routine acted like WD-40 on my pain and could help for almost 24 hours.

“The pain specialist taught me not to look for the pain to go completely way but to learn how to make it easier. I had to figure out what things set me up for another attack of severe pain. For example, I cannot sit straight up for more than 2 hours or I will feel an intensity of pain for 2 days. Walking, resting, soaking all help my pain and allow me to get some exercise.

“There is just no way to avoid every single emotional distress in my life and I know stress increases pain. When emotional stress happens, I need to double down on my pain-relieving strategies.

“It’s been a long time and the pain has changed but never goes away completely. I continue to respect it. I take small doses of Tylenol for the hard times and on a “bad pain day”–when the pain makes every fiber in my entire body scream out–I make myself tough it through until about 9 at night and then I take one eighth of a dose of a narcotic pain killer and go to bed.” – Martina Lopez

* Pseudonym
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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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Pelvic Mesh: The End of Sex

Gee, if a woman thought there was a one in four chance that she was not going to have sex again for the rest of her life, do you think she would sign up for pelvic mesh?  It’s a no-brainer. In a 2010 study by Coleen McDermott, 26% of women had trouble with painful sex after their pelvic mesh implants. Other studies averaged 9.1%.

What would you do? Would you have the implant if you knew ahead of time? The problem with mesh is that women aren’t warned that getting a transvaginal mesh implant may end her sex life—for good.

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Dyspareunia (dɪspəˈruːnɪə) (Pronunciation here) is an extremely painful condition in which sexual arousal, self-pleasure, orgasm or vaginal penetration becomes intolerable, often straining relationships to the breaking point. It is caused by mesh erosion, mesh infection, mesh shrinkage or extensive fibrosis  after multifilament polypropylene or absorbable mesh implants are put in. It often happens in conjunction with vaginal erosion and even your sexual partner can sustain an injury. One study reported that transobturator slings are particularly troubling with 24 % of those patents reporting painful sex for the first time in their lives.

Treatments include physical therapy (although mesh veterans recommend do not have pelvic P.T. while the mesh is still inside), lubricants, vaginal suppositories with pain medication but the best outcomes are after complete mesh removal. Finding a surgeon with the competence to completely remove your mesh is your best option to preserve your relationship. (more info on surgeons soon on pelvicmeshownersguide.com)

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Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. This is an excerpt from Pelvis in Flames: Your Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Your input is welcome to help make Pelvis in Flames the book you need to read.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, join my group, Surgical Mesh or check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com..

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