Category Archives: Pelvic Pain

Pudendal Nerve Injury Caused by Improper Insertion of TOT Obturator Tape – Pelvic Pain

The two main nerve complications TOT-injured women report in support groups are 1) pudendal and 2) obturator in that order. Because most studies do not evaluate for nerve injuries past 3-12 months, there is no scientific estimate of how common the injury is. Our experience is that it is extremely common. Pudendal injury causes persistent pain localized around the urethra and around the clitoris, irradiating to the one labia majora (maximum at the lower edge of symphysis) or both.

Polypropylene creates cripples when placed inside the pelvis.

The pudendal nerve is nowhere near the pathway of an obturator tape so how did the women get injured? The mystery may have been solved by three Czech investigators.

In 2011, Jaromir Masata & Petr Hubka & Alois Martan decided to look into why their patient, a 48 years old female obtained a pudendal nerve injury. After receiving a TVT-O, the woman experienced what the authors saw as an “atypical” postoperative pain that continued without relief for three years. While the authors treated her with injections and replaced her sling with yet another dubious tape, the work they did to track down the cause of her injury is valuable.

Authors circled scar and placed a “+” pointing to correct placement location.

The woman’s insertion scar (see Figure 1) was in the wrong place. By using a cadaver to trace the aberrant passage of her sling, the researchers found it intersected with the pudendal nerve. How many others were injured this way? Are you one of them? Was your transobturator tape placed incorrectly? If the manufacturer provided short videos and an instruction sheet, was that adequate training for your surgeon?

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Specialized MRI and 3D Ultrasound See Mesh – CT Can’t

Too many surgeons are sending patients to have a CT (Cat Scan) and,  when the radiologist says he/she can’t see mesh, tell the patient the mesh must have disappeared or dissolved when a CT cannot identify mesh. Plastic mesh does not dissolve. Sadly too many patients have their pain disrespected or disregarded when the problem is the doctor’s. Only specialized 3D Ultrasound with the right technician and radiologist (more on this coming in another blog soon) and specialized MRI’s with the skills to see it and read it can identify mesh.
Here is a graphic, courtesy of www.scbtmr.org that you can print out an take to your doctor.

MRI to find mesh

How to see mesh with an MRI

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RECIPE for Mesh Victims: Pasta Prima Vera

(A little comic relief after so much pain)

Pudendal Pasta Primavera Recipe

  • Prep time: Between 20 minutes and 5 hours
  • Cook time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 regular strength Tylenol (you may substitute your choice of pain killer as needed)
  • 1/2 pound vermicelli pasta or spaghetti
  • 1 small bunch precut broccoli
  • 1 small zucchini, diced
  • 1/2 cup plus one unopened bag of frozen peas
  • 1/2 cup snow peas
  • 2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 8 ounce can seeded and diced tomatoes
  • 12 basil leaves, 3 tbsp. chopped or pre-packaged pesto
  • 4 Tbsp. butter
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth (use vegetable broth for vegetarian option)
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt
  • 1 chilled bottle dry French white wine.

 

Method

1 Take pain killer. At the same time:

2 Fill a huge pot with water with water and turn on to “high.” Salt well. Set your strainer in the sink, turn on your timer to 13 minutes and go lay down with your feet up as high as you can tolerate.

  1. When alarm rings, throw pasta and set timer for 7 minutes. You must work quickly. Grab all other ingredients, open them and spread them on the counter.
  2. Put your hands on the edge of counter, legs back about 2 feet away and bend forward, breathe out a big loud sigh and stretch your pelvis so it doesn’t lock up on you while you’re standing. Hold this position for 30 seconds or until timer rings.
  3. At the 7-minute timer, throw broccoli in with the pasta. Boil for 1 minute. (You may try standing on one leg for 30 seconds and then the other if it helps.) Add the snow peas, and the 1./2 cup of frozen peas and boil for 30 more seconds.
  4. Quickly pour pasta and vegetables through the strainer and cool them under water. Leave them in the strainer, set the timer for 10 minutes and run back to lay down again, this time taking the bag of frozen peas with you. Apply to pelvis.
  5. When the timer rings, head back to the kitchen and throw the bag of peas back in the freezer.
  6. In a large sauté pan, heat the butter over medium-high heat. When the butter is hot, throw in the garlic powder, the diced tomatoes and sauté for 2 minutes, stirring often and shifting your weight from side to side.
  7. Pour in the chicken or vegetable broth and turn the heat to high to bring it to a boil. While waiting for it to boil, put one hand on top of another on the counter, lean forward and rest your forehead on the back of your hands, try to stretch your pelvis if it help. Add generous amounts of loud groans or tears as needed.
  8. Add the cream and stir just long enough to combine. Turn the heat down until the cream-chicken broth mixture is just simmering, not boiling.
  9. Add the Parmesan cheese and stir to combine. If the sauce seems too thick—it should be pretty thick, but not gloppy—add some more chicken broth, cream or water.
  10. As soon as the sauce is done or you are running into too much pain, transfer the pasta/vegie mess with tongs into the sauce and toss it around to combine. Add the basil now and salt if needed. Throw some black pepper over everything and grab a dish full to take back with you while you lay down again.
  11. After a half-hour rest, put remaining Pudendal Pasta Primavera in individual dishes and store in fridge. Eat for every meal until gone. If you hurt too much, eat it cold.

Note: You will want a dry white wine with this, ideally a chilled dry French white. Put the bottle against your pelvis for ten minutes at a time until pain relief is felt.

Leave dishes for someone else.

Tried, tested and enjoyed by ©Peggy Day

 

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Doubly Traumatized: Pelvic Mesh & the Sexual Abuse Survivor

Dual Trauma

Two things happened this past week that make it imperative to write about the connection between two traumas: sexual abuse and pelvic mesh injury.

First, Melynda, a dually-traumatized woman wrote a tearful story of her trip to get a transvaginal ultrasound:

I arrive at my scheduled time, make my way to radiology and wait for someone to take me back to the room. My pain is an 8-9 at this point and I am starting to shake because, goddammintalltohell, I am so exhausted of having strangers fiddling with my lady parts, I can’t even sit down and relax. (Remember also I am a survivor of child sexual abuse/incest and rape when I was 17 and have had all the wretched trauma of mesh, too).
In walks this older gentleman in scrubs and says, “Are you here for an ultrasound?”
I was so confused. Why is there an old man telling me he is going to be doing my transvaginal ultrasound!!!!??????
I started crying right then and there. “No, no, no, no, NO. I can’t do this with you. I am so sorry, I need a woman tech.”
He tells me it’s him or I will be forced to reschedule. I lose it. I tell him I need some time to calm myself down and then I go lock myself in the bathroom and sit there for 15 minutes while I sob uncontrollably and struggle to breath.
Before this mesh disaster, I wasn’t like this. I could have pelvic exams with no problem. I have been to years of counseling to help me overcome the abuse/incest and rape and I count myself as a survivor of both of those things. But these mesh injuries and the resulting treatments I have to endure. That is what left me sobbing in the hospital bathroom, shaking so hard I couldn’t even hold my phone.

Two days later, Buzzfeed published a document written to an arrogant rapist. The letter set off a maelstrom of outrage. The valiant victim described those hellacious moments when she slowly came to the realization she’d be brutally raped:

I … went to pull down my underwear, and felt nothing. I still remember the feeling of my hands touching my skin and grabbing nothing. I looked down and there was nothing. The thin piece of fabric, the only thing between my vagina and anything else, was missing and everything inside me was silenced. I still don’t have words for that feeling. In order to keep breathing, I thought maybe the policemen used scissors to cut them off for evidence.

Women dancing copy

Freedom is for women, too.

The physical and psychic numbness, immeasurable pain, wanting to shed her own body, and begging for time to process her trauma; while her attacker and the judge continue to intensify his horrific attack by turning the spotlight of blame onto her instead of him. Her words set off a campaign to remove the judge and, at the same time, further ignite the opprobrium of pelvic mesh-injured women who suffer so many of the same symptoms. A pelvic mesh-related injury feels like a rape in the aftermath. For all intents and purposes, it is rape, sometimes with genital mutilation.
For sexual assault victims, mesh pain takes them right back into a post traumatic state. Pelvic mesh victims are offered little redress while the device makers are permitted to increase sales, rush new versions to market, and continue to profit unfettered.

You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice…

How many pelvic mesh victims have uttered these same words? And these:

I am no stranger to suffering. You made me a victim. … For a while, I believed that that was all I was. I had to force myself to … relearn that this is not all that I am. … I am a human being who has been irreversibly hurt, my life was put on hold …
My independence, natural joy, gentleness, and steady lifestyle I had been enjoying became distorted beyond recognition. I became closed off, angry, self deprecating, tired, irritable, empty. The isolation at times was unbearable. You cannot give me back the life I had before that night either. While you worry about your shattered reputation, I …hold … spoons to my eyes to lessen the swelling so that I can see.
I … excuse myself to cry in stairwells. I can tell you all the best places … to cry where no one can hear you. The pain became so bad that I had to explain private details to my boss to let her know why I was leaving. I needed time because continuing day-to-day was not possible. I used my savings … I did not return to work full time … My life was put on hold for over a year, my structure had collapsed.
There are times I did not want to be touched. I have to relearn that I am not fragile, I am capable, I am wholesome, not just livid and weak.

If you would like to join a small support group for people with both mesh injuries and a history of sexual abuse/assault, join here. ,–LINK UPDATED

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome is common to both injuries and healing involves stages. No two women are ever alike and no healing patterns are identical. In hopes for your continued, safe, comforted, and thorough healing, here is a list of the stages:

Stages of healing from sex abuse

Page 1

Stages of healing from sex abuse pg 2

Page 2

I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
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Partial Pelvic Mesh Removal — Wrong Solution to Permanent Problem

Your surgeon says he or she can snip the part of the mesh sling they can see, a quick operation and you’ll be better. Or says he can cut it to release it because it was put in too tight. Or, he promises a full removal but the operation takes less than an hour and, if the parts go to pathology, most of the mesh is still not accounted for.

Women who knowingly or unknowingly have partial removal surgery come to regret it. They issue strong warnings for the lucky women who read or search for answers online before signing up for a partial removal. Thousands of Urogynecologists and Urologists do partial removals. The very people who profit from mesh tell those specialists how to handle complaints: just cut a little out. Some heartless doctors cut it right there in the office with no anesthesia whatsoever.

The woman who have been through this tell newcomers not to allow a surgeon to cut bits and pieces of mesh but to leave it whole for a qualified surgeon with the skills to necessary to remove the entire device in one operation. They warn that doctors are not telling the truth about those partial surgeries.

Frayed rope is like sliced mesh

Partial removal can be a temporary solution to a permanent problem. Nearly everyone gets temporary relief after a partial surgery. When a rope breaks, the ends fray. That’s what happens with partials. All the ends leak toxic chemicals, stirring up a immune storm inside your body and spring back, eventually attaching to other parts of your vagina, bladder, intestines, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. After a year or two, you develop new symptoms and go looking for a doctor who can help. More than 99% of board certified surgeons will do another partial. Some women have dozens of surgeries before finding help from advocacy groups.

Be very careful. Get the whole thing out in any way you can because you are in the best possible shape to have a good outcome when your surgeon goes after the whole thing and it’s still intact! When mesh is cut, the next surgeon must go searching for shreds of it. They compare that surgery to trying to get bubble gum out of hair or searching for shrapnel.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

If your surgery took less than four hours, consider that it may not be a complete removal, get your medical and surgical records and your pathology report. Learn the dimensions of your implant and ask for an accounting for every piece of it. Before your explant surgery, demand a micro and macro pathology be done. Afterward, get those reports!

We’ve found only five surgeons in the U.S. who consistently prove they removed complete pelvic mesh including arms or anchors (fixation devices):

  • Shlomo Raz, UCLA
  • Dionysis Veronikis, St. Louis, MO
  • Una Lee, Seattle WA
  • Dmitriy Nikolavsky, Syracuse, NY
  • Michael Hibner, Phoenix, AZ

The surgery is very risky but research has shown that is in no more risky that partial removals.

Beware of sugeons loan companies Beware of Mesh News
If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.
PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.





Pelvic Mesh: How People Died

Rosey Y died in 2013 after a string of illnesses after she was implanted in 2006 with a the Gynecare Prolift transvaginal mesh to treat pelvic organ prolapse. The Prolift had been introduced by Johnson & Johnson (J&J) in 2005 without an approval from the Food and Drug Administration (F.D.A.) and wreaked havoc on unsuspecting women until it was taken off the market in 2012.

Rosey’s sling sawed itself out of place, slicing right into her vagina and causing her last few years to be filled with infections and chronic suffering. She became totally disabled. “I sure never thought that some day I’d be crying just cause I can’t stand to wear underwear, much less pick up my grandkids,” she said. “After the surgery I couldn’t walk properly and was in constant cutting pain. Doctors say I am the first patient to ever have these problems.”


Screen Shot 2015-12-17 at 10.58.31 AM

Pelvic Mesh MAUDE Deaths

Very little is known about forty-nine people who died unexpectedly after pelvic mesh implant surgery. Small traces of their loves, their lives, and their lost futures appear “between the lines” in sparse, single paragraphs written by complete strangers and submitted to the F.D.A. in an Adverse Event report. There is no report for Rosie Y. For privacy reasons, the F.D.A. limits the amount of information that is made public. Using the short “Event Narrative” and “Manufacturer Narrative” attached to most of these 49 reports, we can piece together a few circumstances surrounding their deaths. Alone, each story makes little sense; gathered together, a much larger story unfolds.

When someone becomes ill, injured, or dies after they have a surgical implant, the manufacturers, importers and device user facilities are mandated by law to report the case to the F.D.A.’s MAUDE, (Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience) database. In addition, health care professionals, patients and consumers are encouraged to make voluntary reports. (Instructions for filing a consumer report can be found here.)

The FDA MAUDE search tool is grossly limited. While it seems easy to search for “death” and “pelvic mesh” and find a complete list of all the people who died after pelvic mesh implants, it’s just not that simple. Words are misspelled; companies have two names or change names. Simply adding a location to the company name, such as Johnson and Johnson’s (J&J) Ethicon division does, will eliminate “hits,” so I must begin this report with this caveat:

“It is important to consider the multiple sources of potential error and bias in the underlying data.” It is my opinion that quantitative assessment of reporting rates to the FDA’s spontaneous reporting site (MAUDE) cannot be used to prove assertions about actual incidence rates for any events.
However, after twenty-years of registered nursing (where I witnessed unreported events) and eight years spent supporting mesh patients with injuries, I believe the number of reports on the FDA database is greatly underrepresented and the real tragedy of surgical mesh: the debilitating illnesses and injuries, the deaths, hospital-acquired infections, surgeon errors, and suicides, is exponentially higher than MAUDE represents.

* * *

On the first day of Summer, 2013, a woman underwent surgery for an anterior prolapse (sinking of the bladder or urethra into the vaginal wall). As the surgeon prepared to insert a Gynecare Gynemesh, the procedure required him to use a puncture needle to make a hole to secure a corner of mesh. When the surgeon punched the needle through her sacrospinous ligament, she began to bleed. The mesh was still lying on the Mayo Stand, ready to be implanted as she died. Try as he might, the surgeon was not able to stop the bleeding.

An Ethicon representative later wrote to the FDA about the event. With an air of cool detachment coming from someone who had not held her own breath while watching the woman on the operating room table slowly loose her color, see the nurses and doctors race unsuccessfully to save her, or sit beside the woman’s husband as he was told the devastating news. The Ethicon employee typed these stark words: “…but the patient was dead.”

The woman died three years after Ethicon pulled four other pelvic mesh products from the market while announcing it would continue to sell the one she was supposed to get. J&J wrote a letter to the FDA in 2010 stating “Ethicon also plans to update the product labeling for GYNECARE GYNEMESH® PS, including the Indication for Use, to restrict the indication for use to the abdominal sacrocolpopexy procedure (A surgical technique for repairing pelvic organ prolapse, an open abdominal or minimally invasive  technique) for the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse.”

If Ethicon had pulled the Gynemesh along with the other four, would that woman still be alive? (Gynecare Gynemesh)

Twenty-four of the forty-nine deaths were associated with a pelvic mesh that was made by J&J’s Ethicon Division, nearly half the deaths we found. Of the 24, Ethicon’s Gynecare Prolift Pelvic Floor Repair Mesh and Tension Free Vaginal Tape Mesh were the most lethal, eight and seven deaths respectively. The patients I help say thought the Tension Free Tape was different because their surgeon assured them that a tape is not the same thing as “the one in the lawsuits.” Both are made of polypropylene, a substance that early scientists declared unfit for the human body and both involve surgery in a place where mother nature had better plans. Whether or not the design of the Prolift and the Tension Free Tape is directly responsible for the fourteen deaths is nearly impossible to prove because it just wasn’t investigated.

* * *

Three other women died of hemorrhage. One woman, who also left her mesh behind on the Mayo Stand in the OR, was about to get a Prolift mesh. During the procedure, Ethicon noted, “the surgeon injured a large vessel” while he was performing a “finger dissection.” The surgeon was unable to stop the bleeding and gave her twenty units of blood trying to save her life. The device reporter, a little more compassionate than the one above, wrote, “unfortunately, she died on the operating table.” The company requested additional information but none was provided, so little more is known about the woman or her family.

One question lingers: how could a finger dissection tear open a major blood vessel when blood vessels are tough and fingers are covered by gloves? (Ethicon Prolift)

* * *

A woman hemorrhaged and died on October 3, 2004 after receiving Ethicon’s Tension Free Vaginal Tape. Her surgeon knew she was on a potent a blood thinner medication and took precautions by putting her on the weaker anti-coagulant, clexane. Although surgery went well, the woman collapsed seven hours later. She was resuscitated once and taken back to surgery where the surgeon cut the tape in half and performed a Burch suspension (suspending the bladder by a strong suture, equally effective and less hazardous as synthetic mesh). Her surgeon removed over two quarts of blood but couldn’t find the source of the bleeding. After three days, she died of a heart attack (a blood clot to a heart vessel). Astoundingly, there was no autopsy so her story will never be complete. Clexane carries this warning: “Major hemorrhages including retroperitoneal and intracranial bleeding have been reported. Some of these cases have been fatal.” (Ethicon Tension Free Vaginal Tape)

Three years later, a woman had surgery to receive a Gynecare TVT (transvaginal tape) Obturator Mesh and her surgeon described her surgery as “successful.” After surgery, her abdomen became distended and her blood pressure dropped. A vascular surgeon could not find the source of her bleeding. She refused blood transfusions because of her religious preference and the next day she died. Although there was an autopsy planned, there is no MAUDE report with the result. (Ethicon Gynecare Transvaginal Tape)

I wonder if women who are in a very unpleasant situation, suffering from emotionally-charged embarrassment with pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence, truly understand that death is a very real danger connected to pelvic mesh surgery. Would they still sign a surgical consent? Would their husbands so easily leave them at the door to surgery if they knew that, one day, this very hospital would serve as a reminder of their deepest loss? Would a woman walk out of her home one morning, mentally check if the stove was off and plan for her next Thanksgiving dinner, if she realized she might never walk again? Never have sex again? Never meet grandchildren? I wonder.

Mesh is for screens 2                                       * * *

Pulmonary embolism has long been feared and respected as a major risk of surgery. Today, the incidence of this tragedy has been markedly reduced due to changes and interventions in post operative care. People no longer linger in bed for two weeks–instead  encouraged to get up and walk right after surgery. Compression stockings are applied and anticoagulant medication is given. Still, four of every thousand gynecological surgery patients have a pulmonary embolism.

On November 19, 2005, a woman received a Tension Free Vaginal Tape implant. Her MAUDE facts are scarce. She died a week afterward from a pulmonary embolism but no autopsy was done, yet Ethicon reports that her doctor did not think her death was related to the mesh. (Ethicon Tension Free Vaginal Tape)

March the thirteenth of 2010 was the another patient’s last day. She died of pulmonary embolism following surgery to implant both the Tension Free Tape and the Prolift devices. After surgery, she got up to urinate, felt weak, passed out and died. There was no more information offered on the MAUDE report. (Ethicon Prolift and Tension Free Vaginal Tape)

Another woman who died of pulmonary embolism had Coloplast Company product on January 25, 2013. The patient received a Restorelle® L synthetic mesh at some unknown date and later experienced a recurrence of her prolapse with the mesh exposed through her rectum. She had a pulmonary embolism, which lead to a fatal heart attack.

Before she died, her surgeon inserted a pessary ring into her vagina to treat the new prolapse. An x-ray revealed that her device had migrated away from her tailbone at the rear of her implant. The MAUDE report reads, “it was a pull-out of mesh from the anterior longitudinal ligament.” She had a surgery called a sacral colpopexy and was sent home from the hospital. On her way home, she became dizzy, short of breath, had chest pain, blurry vision and then passed out. Her heart stopped. She was resuscitated and admitted to the ICU but after two days, according to the MAUDE reporter, “the patient was made DNR (do not resuscitate) and her care was withdrawn.” She then died of pulmonary emboli (more than one) and a cardiac arrest. (Coloplast Restorelle® L)

A doctor was the MAUDE reporting party for the second of two Coloplast patients. This woman died of sepsis after a gruesome post operative course. To treat her vaginal prolapse and fix her enterocele (posterior vaginal hernia), she was implanted with one of the Restorelle products. She went home with no apparent problems but soon returned with a fever, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. A CT showed she had a pelvic abscess which was drained. Soon after, she her blood pressure dropped to a dangerous level and she was transferred to the ICU in septic shock.

Surgeons tried to help by removing the vaginal mesh and took out all of the necrotic (infected and dead) tissue—she lost part of her vagina. Despite the interventions, her sepsis continued. Surgeons again took out more dead tissue, rerouted her intestines to a colostomy and implanted a Wound VAC (a somewhat painful device to drain serous fluid and blood and close the wound). Within days, she was only alive because of the assistance of a mechanical ventilator. She developed pneumonia. Sadly, her family felt it best to ask the doctor to take her off the ventilator. She died on May 13, 2012. (Coloplast Restorelle®)

Sepsis is a serious and often life-threatening condition with the presence of bacteria (bacteremia), other infectious organisms, or toxins created by infectious organisms in the bloodstream with spread throughout the body. On Oct 19, 2007, one woman had a sacral colpopexy done in conjunction with the implantation of Ethicon Gynecare Gynemesh PS Mesh. Her manufacturer reported to MAUDE that the surgery was “uncomplicated and easy.” (One wonders, for whom?) About six or eight hours after surgery, her blood pressure dropped and, suspecting she had aspiration pneumonia, doctors put her on antibiotics. After a rough ten-day course in the hospital, they finally discovered she had a bowel perforation—not pneumonia. Her colon was removed and her rectum closed. During that surgery, doctors found she had an infected hematoma “up the right side colic gutter” (slang for parabolic gutter: one of two open areas between the wall of the abdomen and the colon). The woman died two days later and the cause of death is reported to be, “multiple organ failure from sepsis due to a bowel perforation related to the surgery.” It all started with her pelvic organ prolapse. (Ethicon Gynecare Gynemesh PS Mesh)

Three years later, on 06/28/2010, another woman had an eerily similar experience after an Ethicon Prolift+M Pelvic Floor repair. J&J’s representative reported that her bowels and bladder stopped working one day after her surgery. An ultrasound was done and they found a tennis ball sized blood clot. Surgeons operated again suspecting her colon had been nicked and, sure enough, found part of the mesh, the right posterior arm, had been attached to her sigmoid colon (a grave and life-threatening surgical error). Tragically, the surgeons felt she was in too fragile a condition to withstand a removal of the arm so she was treated with heavy-duty antibiotics and sent home.

She was rushed back for an emergency admission in grave condition with septic shock. She was resuscitated and placed on a ventilator, underwent one more surgery, but did not make it. Her official cause of death was, “multi-organ failure with urosepsis.” (Ethicon Prolift+M Pelvic Floor Repair)

The manufacturer’s representative who reported this incident to MAUDE must never have been in the room with a family while the doctor carefully chooses his words to deliver life-shattering news; never watched taut shoulders suddenly drop, or lips quiver as family members wait for the doctor to finish the most horrific sentence they’ll ever hear—as if they know what he’s going to say but keep hoping won’t he won’t say it. The risk manger who sent this report probably never felt her own shoulder turn wet and warm while she held a patient’s sobbing adult child, trying to keep them from collapsing to the floor under the unbearable weight of their grief. Never heard a daughter sob and ask, “What do I do now?” and silently struggle for an answer. Never heard the loud, deep, long, guttural sound of a devastated loved one resounding through her own body and down the hallways of the hospital—a sound that would ring in her ears throughout the rest of her day. Never walked softly through the remainder of her shift, carrying her own grief for her patient as she emptied bedpans for her others.

Ethicon’s rep just did her job. She took shortcuts as she wrote her testimony of this woman’s disastrous death. Here it is exactly as it appears on MAUDE,

…“the device instructions for use warn ‘use the gynecare prolift+m systems with care, and with attention to pt anatomy and to proper dissection technique, to avoid damage to vessels, nerves, bladder, bowel and vaginal wall perforation. Users should be familiar with surgical procedures and techniques involving pelvic floor repair and synthetic meshes before employing the gynecare prolift+m systems.’”

A fisherman casts his fishing net on the coast at sunset Gabon

A fisherman casts his fishing net on the coast at sunset Gabon

Of all the reports we found, only one was written by a civilian. It was written by a son who watched his mother go downhill, tried everything within his power to stop her downward trajectory and is, to this day, is haunted by her suicide. He aggressively continues her fight against the use of synthetic surgical mesh.

I’ll let you read his own words:

“My mother had the Johnson and Johnson Gynecare Prolift (posterior) Repair system and the Uretex Synthetic Sling implanted on [date redacted by FDA] 2008. Approximately four months ago, she started having problems such as erosion out of her vagina with severe pain. She was going weekly to have her bladder flushed with antibiotics because of erosion into her bladder too. She was having severe constipation problems believed to be associated with the sling. She tried pain pills but they would not help with the pain. She would set up in bed laying across several pillows begging for relief. My mother was in such pain that she went in the backyard and shot herself. She is now gone due to the FDA (allowing) this mesh to be put in women. Reason for use: prolapse. Just given a prescription for pain.” (Gynecare Prolift (posterior) Repair system and Uretex Synthetic Sling)

* * *

Ethicon’s MAUDE risk managers often copy and paste phrases from one report to another. Here is an example: “Conclusion: no conclusion can be drawn at this time. Should additional info  be obtained, a supplemental 3500a form will be submitted accordingly.” The 3500a form is a voluntary report.

* * *

Other women whose deaths are memorialized by MAUDE include:

•    1/25/2010 – One whose had a sponge left inside by her surgeon, an all too frequent surgical error. The surgeon went back in and removed the sponge but left the mesh inside her. She went home where, after a few days, she collapsed and died of a pulmonary embolism. (Ethicon Prolift+M)

•    One who had a heart attack the day after her surgery. Her surgeon said it was unrelated to her surgery. (Ethicon Prolift)

•    One who developed a massive strep infection (necrotizing faciitis) in the days after surgery and had her mesh and much of her vaginal tissue removed. She soon died from the infection. All bodies carry strep. The very brief MAUDE report mentions her body carrying strep, but does not link her massive infection to the surgical technique used to implant the tape. Her mesh was implanted by dragging it through her vagina, an area considered “clean contaminated” and impossible to sterilize. (Ethicon Tension Free Vaginal Tape Mesh)

•    In 2005, no autopsy was performed after a woman who developed excessive bleeding six weeks after a transobturator bladder sling (TOT) implant died. Despite the lack of investigation, the report says, “ physician indicated that the obtape sling did not contribute to the patient’s condition.” (Mentor Corporation Obtape Sling Transobturator)

•    Another woman who had a TOT, knew right away she had a big problem. She had “excruciating pain” and couldn’t pee which lead to multiple bladder infections and eventually to sepsis just before she died.

[Take note: the name of the product in the FDA report was misspelled as “Oburator”—it would not pop up in a MAUDE search engine if the user searched for “Obturator.”] (Ethicon, Inc. Gynecare TVT Obturator System Mesh)

•    In July of 2005, a Risk Manager from a “User Facility,” (hospital, outpatient diagnostic or treatment facility, nursing home or ambulatory surgical facility) reported the death of a woman who died three days after getting an obturator tape. The day after her surgery, she was feeling “punky” and was told to stay home and take over the counter medications for pain and fever. The following day, she was rushed to the ER in full sepsis, put on a ventilator, and died the day after. The cause of death: “Overwhelming sepsis of undetermined etiology, acute renal failure, metabolic acidosis, and ARDS.” The reporter added: “Autopsy=no spesis (sic) source identified, all postmortem cultures negative.”

This woman’s case got some additional attention. There are three “Event Descriptions” for her, each a little different and all seemingly written in haste; descriptions included multiple misspellings, grammatical and typographical errors, and casual abbreviations. The second report added dates to the first. The last one, which appears to be written by the same author, is copied here without editing: “company’s original communication stated ‘during normal course of design verification, co has concluded material mediated pyrogenicity studies in rabbits for the device. All results have been positive. Generally co would only conduct a lal test to confirm a positive mm  pyrogen study. As none of the tvt tests have shown positive mm results, company does not have lal results available for the tvt.’ The use of the term ‘positive’ in the second sentence was in conflict with it’s use later. The use of ‘positive’ was meant to mean the tests passed, i. e. Did not have a pyrogenic result. A more appropriate statement is ‘all test results have shown no pyrogenic response.'”*

One only has to wonder how her family might feel after they read Ethicon’s narrative noted above. (Ethicon Gynecare TVT System Obturator)

* Author note:  Pyrogenic means producing or produced by fever. The MM, or Material Mediated Pyrogen Test, is used to determine whether a saline extract of a medical device causes a pyrogenic response (fever) in rabbits. LAL test is endotoxin testing to ensure injectable therapeutics are safe for human use.   


Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.




22+ Crucial Questions to Ask Surgeon Before Mesh Surgery

 1. What is the operation being recommended? Is it necessary?

 2. Why is the operation necessary?

 3. I am aware that a bladder sling or hernia mesh is made of polypropylene and the material is the same, whether it is called a “tape” or “minitape.” I do not want polypropylene in my body. Are you willing to do the surgery without the use of synthetic surgical mesh? {__ I am allergic to polypropylene (check if applies to you).}

4. What are my alternatives to this procedure? (for example: I am aware the Burch Procedure has the same rate of success as synthetic surgical mesh. Are you able to do an alternative procedure)

 5. What are the benefits of the surgery and how long will those benefits last?

 6. What are the risks and possible complications of having the operation?

 7. What are my possibilities if I choose not to have the surgery?

 8. How many of these surgeries have you performed?

9. For which specialty do you have a board certification?  Urology, Urogynecology, Gynecology, General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery?  Other?

10. Where will my surgery be performed?

11. How long will my operation take?

12. Why type of anesthesia will be administered? If it is not a hospital, is there emergency equipment if I should have trouble with anesthesia? What is the plan for emergencies? 

13. What type of incision will be used? Will it be an open procedure, minimally invasive or laparoscopic?

14. Do you have to cut close to larger nerves to complete this operation?

15. What are my chances for getting new nerve damage?

16. What is the risk of mesh erosion into healthy organs from this surgery?

17. What are my chances for getting a wound infection? What is the hospital’s nosocomial infection rate? Do you provide antibiotic prophylaxis?

18. What are the specific risks of this procedure?

19. What will my operation cost? What else will I be charged for?

20. What can I expect during recovery?

21. How will my life be changed for the good or bad after this operation?

22. How many future surgeries might I expect after this surgery if there are complications?

Added question: Are you planning to have a salesmen in the operating room with you? I do__ do not___ prefer to have a sales representative in the OR with me.

(Click here for download of copy with fill-in-the-blanks.)


 

 POLY IS FOR ADA RAMPS


 

Places to check-up on your surgeon

It is important to have confidence in the doctor who will be doing your surgery and you can make sure that he or she is qualified. Each state licenses its physicians. Take the time to search for:

       “[Name of State] physician license verification” for your own surgeon.

Make sure to check for disciplinary actions taken or whether the license is current. Example here.

  • Ask your primary doctor, your local medical society, or health insurance company for information about the doctor or surgeon’s experience with the procedure.
  • Make certain the doctor or surgeon is affiliated with an accredited health care facility. When considering surgery, where it is done is often as important as who is doing the procedure.

From PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com                        © Peggy Day November 27, 2015





26 Pelvic Mesh Complications Your Doc Never Mentioned

Welcome to the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide! This page is like a Table of Contents.

Over 4.2 million women have the implants and a quarter to a third of them suffer debilitating complications while doctors say, “It’s not the mesh.” The FDA warned in both 2008 and 2011 that complications are serious. Too many women are finding out they were right all along, it is the mesh. 

If you’re having trouble with mesh, here is a list of 26 complications in the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Sign up for updates to learn more and take the first step on your healing journey.

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26 Mesh Complications Your Doctor Never Warned You About:

1) Intractable Pain (pain that doesn’t go away) – Some people wake up from implant surgery knowing something is wrong. It is too tight or the pain is beyond measuring. Part 1 talks about the post operative pain from pelvic mesh & Part 2 is one woman’s journey with pelvic mesh pain.

2) Excessive BleedingBleeding happens but when is it too much? When to call the doctor? How to regain strength after heavy bleeding

3) Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection – Urinary tract infections are serious health-risks and can involve the bladder and kidney. When mesh is stuck in the bladder it continually irritates the bladder until it is removed surgically. Learn how to prevent UTIs and test yourself at home and to distinguish a bladder infection from a kidney infection.

     4) Wound infectionsA bladder sling can act like a petri dish harboring and incubating strong, sometimes drug-resistant bacteria. Left undiagnosed, they can lead to a delay in wound healing, even open up wide and deep surgical wounds and putting your life at risk.

5) Bladder injuryA slip of the knife, a puncture from an ice-pick like trocar, sling pulled so tight that it cuts the bladder. A bladder injury is one of the most difficult to repair. One study says it happens 10% of the time, another say 75%!

6) Bowel InjuryWhen a part of the bowel is nicked, fecal matter seeps into the interior of the body, when it the diagnosis is delayed or completely missed, patients become extremely ill.

7) Fistula (a hole between two organs) – Imagine your urine draining out of your vagina or your stool coming out. Fistula is all to common and deeply embarrassing for women.

8) Wound Opening Up After Stitches(also called dehiscence) – You think your surgery is healing and you are trying to get back on your feet and back to normal. Then your wound starts to open up. Dehiscence delays healing for a very long time.

9) Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion) As many as one patient in three experiences erosion from mesh. Would you agree to mesh if you were told the odds that you wouldn’t enjoy sex ever again were one in three?

10) Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”The odds that mesh surgery won’t cure your incontinence is the same as other surgical repairs: one in three.

11) Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”A mesh that is implanted too tight can slow down or stop your urine stream for about four percent of patients. Why does your surgeons “handedness” (right- or left-handed) affect your outcome?

12) Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse One study found 26% of women found sex too painful after mesh surgery.

13) Multiple surgeriesWhen things go wrong, often the solution is another surgery and another. Some women have had over a dozen surgeries to correct mesh complications. More surgery = more scarring.

14) Vaginal scarring/shrinkage – Vaginal scarring: one of the most emotionally and physically difficult problems to heal.

15) Emotional DamageNaturally, an injury to a woman’s re-creative center causes emotional pain but can we allow doctors to blame the women?

16) Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damageStinging, burning, pins-and-needles, numbness all are signs of nerve damage. Even the way your body was positioned during surgery can cause nerve damage.

17) Obturator Nerve – Symptoms in your mid-thighs (saddle region).

18) Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric Nerve – Symptoms in your pubic region.

19) Genitofemoral Nerve – Symptoms in your inner groin.

20) Femoral Nerve – Symptoms in your outer thighs

21) Pudendal Nerve Entrapment – Symptoms in your “sit spot.”

22) Fibular Neuropathy – Symptoms on the outside lower legs

23) Saphenous Nerve – Symptoms on your inner lower legs

24) Piriformis Syndrome – Symptoms across your buttocks.

25) Sciatica – Symptoms all the way down your leg.

26) Peripheral Neuropathy – Symptoms from the bottom of your feet and up your legs, even your hands can be involved.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 2


If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Signing Up For Just One Surgery With Pelvic Mesh?

Imagine this: Two women had tree branches fall across their homes causing major damage. Both trees did the most damage to the kitchen. Cindy Lu hires the guys who promises to get the job done the fastest for the least money. Her contractor comes in one day, and chops out the middle of the branch and cleans up the mess on her kitchen floor and replaces her kitchen faucet so it will run. He gets the job done in less than a day. Karen hires a more experienced contractor who takes out the entire branch and repairs all her plumbing, appliances and replaces her furniture and cleans up every tiny piece of bark or wood chip. It takes several days. He comes back later on and fixes the broken walls, windows and doors and returns her home to as close to pre-storm conditions as possible.

Which contractor would you hire?

This is an analogy to what happens when pelvic mesh goes bad. The surgeon who chips away at pelvic mesh, one eroded bit at a time, sets up a patient for multiple surgeries— today’s mesh trouble. Recently, Linda Gross won over 11 million dollars at trial after 18 surgeries to repair erosion, scarring, and tissue damage from a Gynecare Prolift pelvic sling. Surgeries performed after the pelvic mesh implant correct erosion, new or continued incontinence, difficulty urinating, infections, scar tissue, pain, deheisance, or fistulae. Women experiencing generalized symptoms they attribute to mesh opt for removals as well and report an improvement in their symptoms.

MESH IS FOR LAUNDRY

Synthetic surgical pelvic mesh was first thought to be faster, easier and better than traditional repairs like culpopexy and porcine and native tissue sling repairs. Newer research says it  just wasn’t true.  In a 2013 review, authors concluded that, even though sacral colpopexy had a longer operation time: “the sacral colpopexy had a higher success rate on examination and lower reoperation rate than high vaginal uterosacral suspension and transvaginal polypropylene mesh.”

Mesh removal is risky business due its faulty design. Absent-minded scientists have been accused of not stepping back and looking at the “big picture” ever since Thales, the Greek mathematician, looked up at the stars so often that he fell down a well. Designers of pelvic mesh imagined they found the best thing since the flat turret lathe or bifocal eyeglasses. It was so perfect, they must have thought, nobody would ever want to remove it.

It is an interesting observation that more doctors are prone to diagnose only what they can see—on your body, an x-ray, in a lab report then by the patient’s description of her problems. Headaches, backaches and now pelvic pain are the least recognized and treated medical complaints today. Until the “BLUE sh*t” (as Johnson & Johnson execs called Gynecare mesh in a secret email) could actually be seen by the doctors, women’s complaints were ignored. If they got an answer from their doctors, they were advised to have it snipped, dissected, ligated, trimmed or revised. When the mesh kept sneaking back, surgeons removed more little bits.

It takes a highly skilled surgeon like Dr. Shlomo Raz at UCLA to remove all of the mesh, including the anchors (secured ends).  The few surgeons who do remove the mesh in its entirety complain that removing all of shards of mesh from healthy human flesh is like getting bubblegum out of hair.

Dr. Dionysios Veronikis of St. Louis, MO invented a surgical instrument that  dissects the mesh away from the healthy tissue without cutting surrounding structures. He finds one end of the mesh and then carefully cuts, moving his instrument forward until it frees up the entire sling in one piece. It is hours and hours of painstaking work and healing from the procedure takes a long time.

Once mesh is removed, more surgeries are often needed to revise the damage left behind and fix structural problems. Complications, like bleeding, infection, and nerve damage, from mesh removal surgery are common. After finally going through removal surgery, 87% said they would never have had the artificial mesh implant in the first place, if they had only known. If you’ve not yet had an implant, you are one of the lucky ones because, now that there is more research and information is available on the net–mesh does not appear to be easier or better. Many, if not most, doctors are reverting to traditional fixes. You can save yourself a boatload of trouble by finding a surgeon who can repair your problem without mesh.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

6 Personal Stories: Mesh Patients Are Not Mental Patients

Normal reactions to real parts of life are now being shifted into medical diagnoses by a medical and a psychiatric establishment that is fully embedded with Big Pharma. (Big Pharma is a nickname for the world’s vast and influential pharmaceutical industry and its trade and lobbying group, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America or PhRMA. These powerful companies make billions of dollars a year by selling drugs and medical devices, including the ones that cause pelvic mesh trouble.  As drug makers learned how to profit from turning normal grief into a major depression, normal pain response into anxiety or bipolar illness, and normal outrage over disrespectful, dismissive and faulty treatment by surgeons into a psychiatric disorder, more and more mesh victims are being given experimental (untested and unproven) drugs without any real proof that they work.   They don’t work. Before SSRI’s were introduced, 355,000 Americans were disabled by mental illness and after those pills went on the market, then number skyrocketed to 1.25 million!

Women who have been put through the surgical mesh mill and then treated like second-class citizens have honest to goodness, normal emotional responses. They resist being treated like emotional cripples and yet they are being sent to psychiatrists for a reacting to a very real circumstances. The six stories below are a sampling of  thousands of stories from across the world today. Names have been changed for privacy reasons.

Evelyn: “I do not have pain—just complete humiliation at having the fistula and the obvious attention I have to give it. I am a neat freak and this is most unpleasant for me! I keep telling myself that I am not going to die from this and just to carry on. I am definitely an action person, so the best way to deal with all of this for me is to have a plan and always move forward.  I remember the doctor saying that it just healed beautifully. Now the fistula!

“There is always a solution or something for you out there somewhere. Don’t be scared.”

Evelyn is employing some of the most therapeutic techniques for her distress. She is not only telling her story, she is offering help to others. Storytelling is one of the most beneficial tools for dealing with sadness and anger. Reaching out to help others is physically and mentally healing as well.

***

Fiona: “I had a TVT done last Feb, been in chronic, debilitating pain every since. Am 
trying to arrange funds to have removal surgery, scared to death to have one more surgery.”

Fiona is afraid, a normal response to a very real and present danger. When the only alternative is to go back into the very system that hurt you in the first place, being scared to death is a healthy response. He fears will help her to make very cautious and careful decisions for her future medical care.

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Surprisingly, many women were implanted with more than one defective device at the same time:

Ingrid: “I had a TVT-O as well as a ProLift. Stupid and naive that I was, I blindly trusted that they knew what they were doing. What was I thinking?

 “They did this procedure through 6 portals on my inner thighs. When I woke up, the doctor stated I gave them a hard time in that he nicked a blood vessel (fishing through my legs) and I had lost a fair amount of  blood. Things went downhill from there on out.

 “The quality of my life has been really hurt by this ordeal, as one could imagine. Thank God my husband is very understanding.” 



Medicine has changed over the past half-century. It has become a business, and concentrates on turning a profit while minimizing the better good of the patient. Who would not feel betrayed by a botched surgery like this? For a doctor to tell a patient who had been paralyzed and under anesthesia, that she “gave them a hard time?” he has to have lost sight of his role in protecting her from harm. The pathology in this case is the surgeon’s. He did not own up to his own lack of  skill in using the equipment provided to him to complete a proper implant. It’s called blaming the victim.

Also, Ingrid’s husband is providing one of the best “medicines.” Supportive persons can make all the difference because they can counterbalance the inappropriate accusations and botched surgeries like the ones she experienced.

***

Michelle: “To my horror, after going to the bathroom, I discovered my uterus had dropped right out of  my vagina! I can’t possibly describe the feelings of revulsion and guilt that caused. It took me a few days to regain my composure and go to the doctor.”

“Afterward I was in so much pain I couldn’t stand up straight, walk my usual hour a day, or ride in the car more than 15 minutes without getting into so much pain I broke down in tears.”

Michelle’s story illustrates just how important a woman’s pelvic area is to her. Michelle reacted normally for someone injured in her most pivotal, most private place. Michelle was traumatized even though she was asleep during her surgery. Tears for pain and tears for grief are often combined for trauma victims.

MESH INFB Man Woman

Lucille: “I had a TVT and Marina coil fitted at the same time. The surgeon said, ‘Lucille, this is a simple operation with an overnight stay and you will be a new woman.’ He did not mention any complications or risks involved with the TVT. I took his word and trusted he knew what he is doing and accepted to go ahead with the surgery.



“I was and still am a smoker, although I did mention it to him. Once this is all over I will quit! The stresses of life and this awful leakage are disrupting my life.

“Came around from the operation, coughing so bad and my chest really hurt. I was scared. I could not breathe properly. All I could hear was ‘Lucille, you must give up smoking.’

“That night I could not sleep. I was so uncomfortable I kept watching the clock and wishing for morning. Breakfast arrived and I could not eat, had no energy, and told the nurse, ‘I do not feel well.’

The nurse dismissed Lucille’s complaints several times. Instead, she insisted Lucille go for a walk. About 6 steps into the walk, Lucille collapsed and was carried back to bed.

“An urgent x-ray was done, and I was given oxygen. They discovered pulmonary emboli (clots in my lungs) and collapsed lung. I ended up in hospital for the next 10 days!”

“I came home and had severe bleeding. Back into the hospital had marina coil taken out as the doctor assumed it is the coil causing the bleeding. I was not told it could be the TVT!



“Over the next couple of years, I was constantly in and out of hospital, diagnosed with diabetes type 2, heart attack symptoms, tremors, slurred speech, and trouble walking. They could not work out what was wrong with me! I had numerous tests and back and forth to hospital and doctors and was eventually diagnosed with an autoimmune disease.



Three years later, Lucille had more symptoms and her primary doctor told finally diagnosed her vaginal mesh erosion. 

“Enough is enough. We cannot allow this suffering to go on. This mesh should be banned, it has totally destroyed my life.  Although I have kept my mind going with graphic design, I cannot walk very far and now I am housebound! I cannot wait to get this thing out of my body! 

“I am a strong person and believe in inner faith, our beautiful creator has been with me and guiding me through each day, and with constant praying I know eventually this evil mesh stuff will be banned!”

Lucille is employing two of the most potent and effective methods for handling her emotional distress. She is sharing her experience with others giving her a sense of normalcy and community and she relies on her faith in God, giving her personal inner strength. Like Evelyn, she is reaching out to help others.

Polypropylene speed bump copy

Tricia: “For me it centers on ‘informed consent,’ both with the physician and the company that manufactures the mesh. The MD really did a different procedure with a different product than I consented to and that’s just not cool. The standard of informed consent is to provide to a patient with the most common and most serious complications. It also really irks me, as a nurse, that informed consent was really not provided, even after I asked for it.

 “(Before my operation), my doctor had offered several options and I took several weeks to decide. I located four women who’d had bladder surgery using monofilament slings and they all were having problems. I told my surgeon I did not want a (plastic) sling and asked about the biological swine tissue sling. The surgeon instead suggested an abdominal sacral colpopexy. I agreed to this procedure, thinking it was the swine procedure. The patient consent form was in medical terminology and listed the procedure as ‘abdominal sacral colpopexy, transobturator sling.’  The risks listed were ‘bleeding, infection, recurrent cystocele, persistent incontinence, urge incontinence, bladder/bowel injury.’

“(After the surgery,) I had fever, severe abdominal cramping, my right leg was numb, and I felt as if something was lodged at the top of my vagina. I made several visits to the (two) surgeons involved and neither thought I had any valid complaints. Neither would offer a straightforward answer. They never mentioned an implant could be causing my symptoms. 

“At week five I obtained the operating room notes and to my astonishment discovered that two implants were now securely placed in my abdomen: a Gynecare polypropylene 10×10 inch mesh and an AMS Monarc polypropylene mesh sling. I was furious. Because of my anger, the surgeons suggested such things as tranquilizers and psychological help.

“It has been three months and I have seen six surgeons.  I’m told these implants cannot be removed.  My symptoms have intensified.  I am in pain and I am angry.  I recently obtained literature listing the manufacturers risks: ‘foreign body response, vaginal extrusion, erosion through the urethra and surrounding tissue, migration of the device,  fistula formation, adhesion formation, pain, scarring that results in implant contraction, damage to vessels, nerves, bladder, urethra, bowel’ and more. Had I known any of these risks, I would not have had the surgery. I am not alone. I have since spoken with hundreds of men and women who are having complications with implants. Some, like me, didn’t know an implant was part of their surgery until complications arose.”

Tricia’s anger is understandable and normal. She felt she did not need pills or  psychological help and she later turned her anger into action by contacting her congressman and governor and starting a petition to put an end to the practice of performing implants without proper informed consent.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about mesh problems, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.