Category Archives: Painful Sex

Partial Pelvic Mesh Removal — Wrong Solution to Permanent Problem

Your surgeon says he or she can snip the part of the mesh sling they can see, a quick operation and you’ll be better. Or says he can cut it to release it because it was put in too tight. Or, he promises a full removal but the operation takes less than an hour and, if the parts go to pathology, most of the mesh is still not accounted for.

Women who knowingly or unknowingly have partial removal surgery come to regret it. They issue strong warnings for the lucky women who read or search for answers online before signing up for a partial removal. Thousands of Urogynecologists and Urologists do partial removals. The very people who profit from mesh tell those specialists how to handle complaints: just cut a little out. Some heartless doctors cut it right there in the office with no anesthesia whatsoever.

The woman who have been through this tell newcomers not to allow a surgeon to cut bits and pieces of mesh but to leave it whole for a qualified surgeon with the skills to necessary to remove the entire device in one operation. They warn that doctors are not telling the truth about those partial surgeries.

Frayed rope is like sliced mesh

Partial removal can be a temporary solution to a permanent problem. Nearly everyone gets temporary relief after a partial surgery. When a rope breaks, the ends fray. That’s what happens with partials. All the ends leak toxic chemicals, stirring up a immune storm inside your body and spring back, eventually attaching to other parts of your vagina, bladder, intestines, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. After a year or two, you develop new symptoms and go looking for a doctor who can help. More than 99% of board certified surgeons will do another partial. Some women have dozens of surgeries before finding help from advocacy groups.

Be very careful. Get the whole thing out in any way you can because you are in the best possible shape to have a good outcome when your surgeon goes after the whole thing and it’s still intact! When mesh is cut, the next surgeon must go searching for shreds of it. They compare that surgery to trying to get bubble gum out of hair or searching for shrapnel.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

If your surgery took less than four hours, consider that it may not be a complete removal, get your medical and surgical records and your pathology report. Learn the dimensions of your implant and ask for an accounting for every piece of it. Before your explant surgery, demand a micro and macro pathology be done. Afterward, get those reports!

We’ve found only five surgeons in the U.S. who consistently prove they removed complete pelvic mesh including arms or anchors (fixation devices):

  • Shlomo Raz, UCLA
  • Dionysis Veronikis, St. Louis, MO
  • Una Lee, Seattle WA
  • Dmitriy Nikolavsky, Syracuse, NY
  • Michael Hibner, Phoenix, AZ

The surgery is very risky but research has shown that is in no more risky that partial removals.

Beware of sugeons loan companies Beware of Mesh News
If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.
PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.





Why Not Talk About Hernia Mesh?

I often hear that people think that there is too much attention paid to pelvic mesh victims at the cost to the hernia victims. After all, it’s the same material that is used, just cut in a different shape and placed in a different part of the body. And, truth is, pelvic organ prolapse is very similar to a hernia —both are caused by a weakening of muscles.

When I planned this blog, I decided to focus on one type of mesh because it is the one I know best and because I planned to go into depth with my research. In the back of my mind, I want to do another blog called the Hernia Mesh Owner’s Guide —some day.

POLY IS FOR CUTTERS

I hope hernia sufferers will look at the parts of this blog that apply to them because so many complications are the same: the denial by doctors, the nerve injuries, the salesmen in the operating room, the body’s foreign body reaction and the resulting autoimmune diseases, the cancer risk, the pain, loss of consortium, and the loss of ability to work. The great difficulties getting it removed are similar. Mesh shreds, twists, curls, folds, stretches, migrates, disintegrates, etc. no matter where it is placed.

In looking at why the two entities got separated in the first place, it is important to look at the history of several legal battles. Hernia mesh underwent similar legal attacks about 20 years ago. Many versions of hernia were removed, recalled, and quietly taken off the market. Many people sued and won and many lost. In the end, really, the makers won. They just changed a few elements of hernia mesh, paid for scientific studies that proved it was a great product, and went right on marketing it (the same thing is happening with transvaginal mesh).

So, when the makers found a new application for mesh, putting it into women’s most private, most valued and most delicate place, it cause NEW problems because of the anatomy of the pelvis. The lawyers, like chairs on a tipping ship, rushed to represent this new disaster and abandoned the hernia meshes because there is no longer any money in those cases.

Hernia mesh victims: please be aware that not a single victim made this separation; it was done by lawyers.

Sadly, there are probably no lawyers who represent hernia mesh victims unless it involves malpractice and even that is very hard to prove. BigPharma and the AMA put legislation in place long ago to limit the amount you can win. (Tort reform only benefits those entities). BigPharma also controls much of major media. Thank goodness for social media!

 

Peggy Day is working on a book to combine all these stories. She welcomes any input you may have.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.




26 Pelvic Mesh Complications Your Doc Never Mentioned

Welcome to the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide! This page is like a Table of Contents.

Over 4.2 million women have the implants and a quarter to a third of them suffer debilitating complications while doctors say, “It’s not the mesh.” The FDA warned in both 2008 and 2011 that complications are serious. Too many women are finding out they were right all along, it is the mesh. 

If you’re having trouble with mesh, here is a list of 26 complications in the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Sign up for updates to learn more and take the first step on your healing journey.

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26 Mesh Complications Your Doctor Never Warned You About:

1) Intractable Pain (pain that doesn’t go away) – Some people wake up from implant surgery knowing something is wrong. It is too tight or the pain is beyond measuring. Part 1 talks about the post operative pain from pelvic mesh & Part 2 is one woman’s journey with pelvic mesh pain.

2) Excessive BleedingBleeding happens but when is it too much? When to call the doctor? How to regain strength after heavy bleeding

3) Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection – Urinary tract infections are serious health-risks and can involve the bladder and kidney. When mesh is stuck in the bladder it continually irritates the bladder until it is removed surgically. Learn how to prevent UTIs and test yourself at home and to distinguish a bladder infection from a kidney infection.

     4) Wound infectionsA bladder sling can act like a petri dish harboring and incubating strong, sometimes drug-resistant bacteria. Left undiagnosed, they can lead to a delay in wound healing, even open up wide and deep surgical wounds and putting your life at risk.

5) Bladder injuryA slip of the knife, a puncture from an ice-pick like trocar, sling pulled so tight that it cuts the bladder. A bladder injury is one of the most difficult to repair. One study says it happens 10% of the time, another say 75%!

6) Bowel InjuryWhen a part of the bowel is nicked, fecal matter seeps into the interior of the body, when it the diagnosis is delayed or completely missed, patients become extremely ill.

7) Fistula (a hole between two organs) – Imagine your urine draining out of your vagina or your stool coming out. Fistula is all to common and deeply embarrassing for women.

8) Wound Opening Up After Stitches(also called dehiscence) – You think your surgery is healing and you are trying to get back on your feet and back to normal. Then your wound starts to open up. Dehiscence delays healing for a very long time.

9) Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion) As many as one patient in three experiences erosion from mesh. Would you agree to mesh if you were told the odds that you wouldn’t enjoy sex ever again were one in three?

10) Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”The odds that mesh surgery won’t cure your incontinence is the same as other surgical repairs: one in three.

11) Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”A mesh that is implanted too tight can slow down or stop your urine stream for about four percent of patients. Why does your surgeons “handedness” (right- or left-handed) affect your outcome?

12) Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse One study found 26% of women found sex too painful after mesh surgery.

13) Multiple surgeriesWhen things go wrong, often the solution is another surgery and another. Some women have had over a dozen surgeries to correct mesh complications. More surgery = more scarring.

14) Vaginal scarring/shrinkage – Vaginal scarring: one of the most emotionally and physically difficult problems to heal.

15) Emotional DamageNaturally, an injury to a woman’s re-creative center causes emotional pain but can we allow doctors to blame the women?

16) Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damageStinging, burning, pins-and-needles, numbness all are signs of nerve damage. Even the way your body was positioned during surgery can cause nerve damage.

17) Obturator Nerve – Symptoms in your mid-thighs (saddle region).

18) Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric Nerve – Symptoms in your pubic region.

19) Genitofemoral Nerve – Symptoms in your inner groin.

20) Femoral Nerve – Symptoms in your outer thighs

21) Pudendal Nerve Entrapment – Symptoms in your “sit spot.”

22) Fibular Neuropathy – Symptoms on the outside lower legs

23) Saphenous Nerve – Symptoms on your inner lower legs

24) Piriformis Syndrome – Symptoms across your buttocks.

25) Sciatica – Symptoms all the way down your leg.

26) Peripheral Neuropathy – Symptoms from the bottom of your feet and up your legs, even your hands can be involved.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 2


If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Signing Up For Just One Surgery With Pelvic Mesh?

Imagine this: Two women had tree branches fall across their homes causing major damage. Both trees did the most damage to the kitchen. Cindy Lu hires the guys who promises to get the job done the fastest for the least money. Her contractor comes in one day, and chops out the middle of the branch and cleans up the mess on her kitchen floor and replaces her kitchen faucet so it will run. He gets the job done in less than a day. Karen hires a more experienced contractor who takes out the entire branch and repairs all her plumbing, appliances and replaces her furniture and cleans up every tiny piece of bark or wood chip. It takes several days. He comes back later on and fixes the broken walls, windows and doors and returns her home to as close to pre-storm conditions as possible.

Which contractor would you hire?

This is an analogy to what happens when pelvic mesh goes bad. The surgeon who chips away at pelvic mesh, one eroded bit at a time, sets up a patient for multiple surgeries— today’s mesh trouble. Recently, Linda Gross won over 11 million dollars at trial after 18 surgeries to repair erosion, scarring, and tissue damage from a Gynecare Prolift pelvic sling. Surgeries performed after the pelvic mesh implant correct erosion, new or continued incontinence, difficulty urinating, infections, scar tissue, pain, deheisance, or fistulae. Women experiencing generalized symptoms they attribute to mesh opt for removals as well and report an improvement in their symptoms.

MESH IS FOR LAUNDRY

Synthetic surgical pelvic mesh was first thought to be faster, easier and better than traditional repairs like culpopexy and porcine and native tissue sling repairs. Newer research says it  just wasn’t true.  In a 2013 review, authors concluded that, even though sacral colpopexy had a longer operation time: “the sacral colpopexy had a higher success rate on examination and lower reoperation rate than high vaginal uterosacral suspension and transvaginal polypropylene mesh.”

Mesh removal is risky business due its faulty design. Absent-minded scientists have been accused of not stepping back and looking at the “big picture” ever since Thales, the Greek mathematician, looked up at the stars so often that he fell down a well. Designers of pelvic mesh imagined they found the best thing since the flat turret lathe or bifocal eyeglasses. It was so perfect, they must have thought, nobody would ever want to remove it.

It is an interesting observation that more doctors are prone to diagnose only what they can see—on your body, an x-ray, in a lab report then by the patient’s description of her problems. Headaches, backaches and now pelvic pain are the least recognized and treated medical complaints today. Until the “BLUE sh*t” (as Johnson & Johnson execs called Gynecare mesh in a secret email) could actually be seen by the doctors, women’s complaints were ignored. If they got an answer from their doctors, they were advised to have it snipped, dissected, ligated, trimmed or revised. When the mesh kept sneaking back, surgeons removed more little bits.

It takes a highly skilled surgeon like Dr. Shlomo Raz at UCLA to remove all of the mesh, including the anchors (secured ends).  The few surgeons who do remove the mesh in its entirety complain that removing all of shards of mesh from healthy human flesh is like getting bubblegum out of hair.

Dr. Dionysios Veronikis of St. Louis, MO invented a surgical instrument that  dissects the mesh away from the healthy tissue without cutting surrounding structures. He finds one end of the mesh and then carefully cuts, moving his instrument forward until it frees up the entire sling in one piece. It is hours and hours of painstaking work and healing from the procedure takes a long time.

Once mesh is removed, more surgeries are often needed to revise the damage left behind and fix structural problems. Complications, like bleeding, infection, and nerve damage, from mesh removal surgery are common. After finally going through removal surgery, 87% said they would never have had the artificial mesh implant in the first place, if they had only known. If you’ve not yet had an implant, you are one of the lucky ones because, now that there is more research and information is available on the net–mesh does not appear to be easier or better. Many, if not most, doctors are reverting to traditional fixes. You can save yourself a boatload of trouble by finding a surgeon who can repair your problem without mesh.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Vaginal Scars A Tough Problem With Mesh

Were you told a bladder sling is an “easy” solution to a leaky, overactive bladder or pelvic organ prolapse? Easy for the surgeon, maybe, but not so easy for thousands of women. Today’s story about mesh trouble is about vaginal scarring, which can make sexual intercourse difficult, even impossible, cause deformities and increase pain.

Scar tissue, made of collagen, a fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue after any injury and can adhere to skin, muscle, or connective tissue. It pulls on the surrounding tissue, making it taut and restricting blood flow. It causes pain when it impinges on nerves or restricts the flow of oxygen-carrying blood to an area. Merely cutting the vagina open and sewing it shut in order to implant mesh leaves scarring—adding polypropylene mesh separates the healthy tissues, causing it to struggle to heal and leaving more damage behind.

Polypropylene bucket copy

Anatomy of a vaginal scar: Even though plastic mesh has been implanted since 1998, scientists really don’t know what they are doing to your body, writing in 2013: “Meshes are widely used in prolapse surgeries to improve anatomical outcomes with little knowledge of the impact on the vagina. Like all organs in the body, the vagina is comprised of several protective layers: adventitia, subepithelium, and smooth muscle layers. Disrupting those important tissues causes scarring. The tissue surrounding the vaginal consists of key structural proteins: collagen, elastin and smooth muscle myosin. These help the vagina to move, stretch and maintain support for its own structure. The introduction of  surgical mesh tho those proteins has the potential to send them into chaos. The more pliable the mesh, the less disorganization occurs in the protective layers. Softer meshes have been recently introduced but they continue to elicit a foreign body response (rejection activity) and encourage thinning of the protective environment which can lead to vaginal erosion.  The 2013 study reported: “Possible mechanisms include the innate immune response and chronic microinjury from mesh micromotion.”

Treatment: Some doctors tell patients that if there is no pain, no dehiscence, no erosion, there will be no treatment. For women who have endured many surgeries trying to relieve mesh comlications, scarring is an enormous issue.

There are a number of treatments available. If the scar is due to infection, antibiotics can reduce infection and inflammation. Estrogen cream and pessaries can improve blood flow and nerve supply to your vagina and promote healthy healing.

The scar can be taken out and the area sewn closed again with newer and smaller sutures—like those used in plastic surgery. Lasers can be used in small areas to dissolve the abnormal tissue and some surgeons combine both modalities.

Physical therapy (PT) can make the tissue more flexible by massaging it or applying ultrasound. Scar tissue massage can be extremely painful and re-traumatizing. Some women cannot tolerate it. For those who can, many report that after months, they find it helps lessen scars.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about mesh problems, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

 

Pelvic Mesh -> Pain Part 2. A Personal Story

Thank you to Martina Lopez (not her real name) who generously offered to allow me to publish her story (with a little editing) about her battle with pelvic pain:

“I heard a Nigerian-American woman, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, say in a speech, that Americans talk about pain differently from Nigerians. Americans, she said, have an expectation that pain can be anathema [something you absolutely cannot stand or you ban from your life]. In Nigeria, she said, pain is expected and nurses aren’t solicitous of patients who complain about it. It lead me to think about how my own journey with pelvic pain has changed my expectations about pain.

“Starting out using narcotics was out of the question for me by the time I was implanted with a bladder sling. I had some very bad reactions to them and a duodenal ulcer meant that all NSAIDs [non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs] were out. I was left with Tylenol at the same time when high warnings about  liver and kidneys damage came out. I tried physical therapy but one visit was enough to send me running for the hills–it was not for me.

“I saw a Psychologist/Pain Specialist who did not prescribe medication but who taught me not to let my mind run from the pain but to turn into it and pay attention to it. He said to learn about its qualities, locations, movements, and what made it better and what made it worse. Doing this was extremely difficult because I was changing my lifetime of attitudes about pain. It took a few months but having someone to report my discoveries about my pain to really helped. I learned there was one position I could put my body into that eased the pain up a bit and discovered that just knowing I could get into it helped me. Unfortunately, the only position that worked was in deep water so I had to wait until I found a pool to get into it. I have get into the water, lay on my back, drop one leg down and let the other stay floating near the surface. Afterward I did a few very slow and gentle stretches in the water. This routine acted like WD-40 on my pain and could help for almost 24 hours.

“The pain specialist taught me not to look for the pain to go completely way but to learn how to make it easier. I had to figure out what things set me up for another attack of severe pain. For example, I cannot sit straight up for more than 2 hours or I will feel an intensity of pain for 2 days. Walking, resting, soaking all help my pain and allow me to get some exercise.

“There is just no way to avoid every single emotional distress in my life and I know stress increases pain. When emotional stress happens, I need to double down on my pain-relieving strategies.

“It’s been a long time and the pain has changed but never goes away completely. I continue to respect it. I take small doses of Tylenol for the hard times and on a “bad pain day”–when the pain makes every fiber in my entire body scream out–I make myself tough it through until about 9 at night and then I take one eighth of a dose of a narcotic pain killer along with the Tylenol and go to bed.”
polypropylene compost bin copy
If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about pain, erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

Pelvic Mesh -> Pelvic Pain Part 1.

When I was eighteen, I lived in the home of an accomplished general surgeon, Dr. Stephen Magyar, as a nanny for his children. During the brief time I lived with the family, I was fortunate to be the beneficiary of his many kindnesses. Sadly,  just after I moved in, he was diagnosed with liver cancer that had metastasized to his spine and he only lived a few more months. During those precious days, his hospital bed was set up in the living room where his many colleagues, patients, family and friends could stop by and visit. I could see that he suffering severe pain as the disease took over his body.

I often stopped by his bedside to tell him how the kids were and he offered me many jewels of fatherly advice—something I missed out on in my own home. He looked up at me one afternoon with his yellowing eyes and said, “I wish I could go back and take care of my patients all over again. I regret that I didn’t take their pain seriously enough. If I could just go back now, I’d would give them more pain-killers than I ever did.” His words guided my actions during my 20 years as a nurse. I always put the patient who was in pain at the top of my priority list.

As many as one in four women suffers from pelvic pain after a mesh implant.  The vaginal area has a complicated design that even the best researchers don’t understand completely yet. The spaces that surgeons open up when implanting meshes were intended to have many functions and cutting into those spaces leave unintended consequences, consequences that are often misunderstood or ignored by too many surgeons. The area that is cut for transobdurator tapes or pelvic slings is part of the process a woman uses to hold back or start her urine, to engage in sexual activity and to evacuate her bowel. Those spaces also connect to her legs, a crucial part of weight bearing exercises which keeping a woman’s body healthy.

Too often, we hear complains by defeated and depressed women who just left the doctor’s office and felt their doctor was demeaning and dismissive of them and their pain. The women know the doctor was in the wrong but have no power to turn off his/her arrogant attitude. The woman often can’t go somewhere else because that doctor is the only one her insurance will allow her to see. Four years ago, Dr. Boortz-Mart told Pain Medicine News, “Our society cannot continue to afford multiple procedures that have no outcomes data aligned with them.”  Trouble with mesh is, there have been no pelvic pain studies with outcomes for physicians can rely on.
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Treatments include over-the-counter and prescription pain, anxiety, and experimental medications. All of these medications have passed the same lax FDA process like plastic mesh. One should become extremely cautious and skeptical with prescription medications these days. Having said that, the ACOG American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published a recommendation for non-mesh related pelvic pain which you can link to here with the caveat that it relies heavily on prescription medication.

Non-drug related pain interventions include physical therapy, ultrasound, electrode stimulation therapy, ice or heat applications, warm soaks, regular gentle exercise, and nerve blocks. Full, complete mesh removal alleviates pain in many but not all mesh implantees.

Pelvic pain in those who have suffered childhood or adult sexual abuse in addition to the polypropylene mesh injury is a special circumstance. New pain can intensify emotional trauma causing new post-traumatic symptoms. Injuries sustained as a child can alter the physical organization in the pelvis lending to more frequent complications. Unfortunately, lawyers have been encouraging those dually-injured victims to remain silent, not talk to other survivors, in a questionable attempt not to compromise cases. This is wrong because there is a theory of law that if your skull is only as thick as an eggshell and someone hits it, they are still responsible for the injury just as if you had been normal. If you have a preexisting injury, that does not make the manufacturers less liable. More on legal issues coming up soon on MeshTroubles.com.

If you are suffering chronic pelvic pain for any reason, it is important not to isolate yourself, even though the pain limits your activities. I recommend joining discussion groups with people who are dealing with pelvic pain. You will find many more helpful suggestions as well as personal encouragement. Many regions also have group therapy for chronic pain sufferers which can be helpful.

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

(Part 2. Personal Story of Pelvic Pain.)

Mesh Troubles Include The End of Sex

Gee, if a woman thought there was a one in four chance that she was not going to have sex again for the rest of her life, do you think she would sign up for pelvic mesh?  It’s a no-brainer. In a 2010 study by Coleen McDermott, 26% of women had trouble with painful sex after their pelvic mesh implants. Other studies averaged 9.1%.

What would you do? Would you have the implant if you knew ahead of time? The problem with mesh is that women aren’t warned that getting a transvaginal mesh implant may end her sex life—for good.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 8

Dyspareunia (dɪspəˈruːnɪə) (Pronunciation here) is an extremely painful condition in which sexual arousal, self-pleasure, orgasm or vaginal penetration becomes intolerable, often straining relationships to the breaking point. It is caused by mesh erosion, mesh infection, mesh shrinkage or extensive fibrosis  after multifilament polypropylene or absorbable mesh implants are put in. It often happens in conjunction with vaginal erosion and even your sexual partner can sustain an injury. One study reported that transobturator slings are particularly troubling with 24 % of those patents reporting painful sex for the first time in their lives.

Treatments include physical therapy (although mesh veterans recommend do not have pelvic P.T. while the mesh is still inside), lubricants, vaginal suppositories with pain medication but the best outcomes are after complete mesh removal. Finding a surgeon with the competence to completely remove your mesh is your best option to preserve your relationship. (more info on surgeons soon on MeshTroubles.com)

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

12 Pelvic Mesh Common Complications That Should Make You Think Twice

Plastics and human flesh, what could possibly go wrong? Ever since the day you had mesh implanted, you’ve had no end of troubles but your doctor says, “It’s not mesh related.”

Severe and life-threatening mesh complications are more frequent and widespread than doctors realize. Here are a dozen mesh problems that women have reported to the FDA:

    1.    Excessive Bleeding
    2.    Infections:    
            ⁃    Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection
            ⁃    Wound infections
    3.    Organ perforation
            ⁃    Bladder injury
            ⁃    Bowel Injury
            ⁃    Fistula (a hole between two organs)
    4.    Wound Opening Up After Stitches –  (also called dehiscence)
    5.    Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion)
    6.    Bladder problems:
            ⁃    Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”
            ⁃    Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”
    7.    Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse
    8.    Intractable painPart 1 & Part 2
    9.    Vaginal scarring/shrinkage
    10.   Emotional Damage
    11.    Multiple surgeries
    12.    Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damage
              ⁃    Can’t sit down
              ⁃    Can’t walk
              ⁃    Wheelchair bound

mesh is for badminton2

Most of these complications will require additional intervention, including medical or surgical treatment and hospitalizations.

About complete/full removals vs partial removals:

I think it is crucial to let you know the best best surgeons are saying that a complete removal of pelvic mesh is the only solution.  This is not the usual or accepted intervention done by most medical centers. We will concentrate on this very soon, but know this: in January of 2011, the National Institute of Health published this statement. “Complications seemed to be more frequent in the group with complete mesh excision, although this difference was not statistically significant.” I strongly recommend you print it out and take it to your surgeon when you are discussing solutions to mesh problems. Tell him/her that complications from complete removals are not statistically different from chipping away at the problem, setting up the patient for multiple surgeries and thereby spreading toxins and infections.

Please send questions or urgent problems by email to daywriter1@gmail.com Meshtroubles.com #pelvisinflames @daywrites