Category Archives: Pudendal Nerve Entrapment

RECIPE for Mesh Victims: Pasta Prima Vera

(A little comic relief after so much pain)

Pudendal Pasta Primavera Recipe

  • Prep time: Between 20 minutes and 5 hours
  • Cook time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 regular strength Tylenol (you may substitute your choice of pain killer as needed)
  • 1/2 pound vermicelli pasta or spaghetti
  • 1 small bunch precut broccoli
  • 1 small zucchini, diced
  • 1/2 cup plus one unopened bag of frozen peas
  • 1/2 cup snow peas
  • 2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 8 ounce can seeded and diced tomatoes
  • 12 basil leaves, 3 tbsp. chopped or pre-packaged pesto
  • 4 Tbsp. butter
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth (use vegetable broth for vegetarian option)
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt
  • 1 chilled bottle dry French white wine.

 

Method

1 Take pain killer. At the same time:

2 Fill a huge pot with water with water and turn on to “high.” Salt well. Set your strainer in the sink, turn on your timer to 13 minutes and go lay down with your feet up as high as you can tolerate.

  1. When alarm rings, throw pasta and set timer for 7 minutes. You must work quickly. Grab all other ingredients, open them and spread them on the counter.
  2. Put your hands on the edge of counter, legs back about 2 feet away and bend forward, breathe out a big loud sigh and stretch your pelvis so it doesn’t lock up on you while you’re standing. Hold this position for 30 seconds or until timer rings.
  3. At the 7-minute timer, throw broccoli in with the pasta. Boil for 1 minute. (You may try standing on one leg for 30 seconds and then the other if it helps.) Add the snow peas, and the 1./2 cup of frozen peas and boil for 30 more seconds.
  4. Quickly pour pasta and vegetables through the strainer and cool them under water. Leave them in the strainer, set the timer for 10 minutes and run back to lay down again, this time taking the bag of frozen peas with you. Apply to pelvis.
  5. When the timer rings, head back to the kitchen and throw the bag of peas back in the freezer.
  6. In a large sauté pan, heat the butter over medium-high heat. When the butter is hot, throw in the garlic powder, the diced tomatoes and sauté for 2 minutes, stirring often and shifting your weight from side to side.
  7. Pour in the chicken or vegetable broth and turn the heat to high to bring it to a boil. While waiting for it to boil, put one hand on top of another on the counter, lean forward and rest your forehead on the back of your hands, try to stretch your pelvis if it help. Add generous amounts of loud groans or tears as needed.
  8. Add the cream and stir just long enough to combine. Turn the heat down until the cream-chicken broth mixture is just simmering, not boiling.
  9. Add the Parmesan cheese and stir to combine. If the sauce seems too thick—it should be pretty thick, but not gloppy—add some more chicken broth, cream or water.
  10. As soon as the sauce is done or you are running into too much pain, transfer the pasta/vegie mess with tongs into the sauce and toss it around to combine. Add the basil now and salt if needed. Throw some black pepper over everything and grab a dish full to take back with you while you lay down again.
  11. After a half-hour rest, put remaining Pudendal Pasta Primavera in individual dishes and store in fridge. Eat for every meal until gone. If you hurt too much, eat it cold.

Note: You will want a dry white wine with this, ideally a chilled dry French white. Put the bottle against your pelvis for ten minutes at a time until pain relief is felt.

Leave dishes for someone else.

Tried, tested and enjoyed by ©Peggy Day

 

  • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
    twitter-iconfacebook-icon



26 Pelvic Mesh Complications Your Doc Never Mentioned

Welcome to the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide! This page is like a Table of Contents.

Over 4.2 million women have the implants and a quarter to a third of them suffer debilitating complications while doctors say, “It’s not the mesh.” The FDA warned in both 2008 and 2011 that complications are serious. Too many women are finding out they were right all along, it is the mesh. 

If you’re having trouble with mesh, here is a list of 26 complications in the Pelvic Mesh Owner’s Guide. Sign up for updates to learn more and take the first step on your healing journey.

POLY IS FOR CABLES copy

26 Mesh Complications Your Doctor Never Warned You About:

1) Intractable Pain (pain that doesn’t go away) – Some people wake up from implant surgery knowing something is wrong. It is too tight or the pain is beyond measuring. Part 1 talks about the post operative pain from pelvic mesh & Part 2 is one woman’s journey with pelvic mesh pain.

2) Excessive BleedingBleeding happens but when is it too much? When to call the doctor? How to regain strength after heavy bleeding

3) Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection – Urinary tract infections are serious health-risks and can involve the bladder and kidney. When mesh is stuck in the bladder it continually irritates the bladder until it is removed surgically. Learn how to prevent UTIs and test yourself at home and to distinguish a bladder infection from a kidney infection.

     4) Wound infectionsA bladder sling can act like a petri dish harboring and incubating strong, sometimes drug-resistant bacteria. Left undiagnosed, they can lead to a delay in wound healing, even open up wide and deep surgical wounds and putting your life at risk.

5) Bladder injuryA slip of the knife, a puncture from an ice-pick like trocar, sling pulled so tight that it cuts the bladder. A bladder injury is one of the most difficult to repair. One study says it happens 10% of the time, another say 75%!

6) Bowel InjuryWhen a part of the bowel is nicked, fecal matter seeps into the interior of the body, when it the diagnosis is delayed or completely missed, patients become extremely ill.

7) Fistula (a hole between two organs) – Imagine your urine draining out of your vagina or your stool coming out. Fistula is all to common and deeply embarrassing for women.

8) Wound Opening Up After Stitches(also called dehiscence) – You think your surgery is healing and you are trying to get back on your feet and back to normal. Then your wound starts to open up. Dehiscence delays healing for a very long time.

9) Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion) As many as one patient in three experiences erosion from mesh. Would you agree to mesh if you were told the odds that you wouldn’t enjoy sex ever again were one in three?

10) Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”The odds that mesh surgery won’t cure your incontinence is the same as other surgical repairs: one in three.

11) Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”A mesh that is implanted too tight can slow down or stop your urine stream for about four percent of patients. Why does your surgeons “handedness” (right- or left-handed) affect your outcome?

12) Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse One study found 26% of women found sex too painful after mesh surgery.

13) Multiple surgeriesWhen things go wrong, often the solution is another surgery and another. Some women have had over a dozen surgeries to correct mesh complications. More surgery = more scarring.

14) Vaginal scarring/shrinkage – Vaginal scarring: one of the most emotionally and physically difficult problems to heal.

15) Emotional DamageNaturally, an injury to a woman’s re-creative center causes emotional pain but can we allow doctors to blame the women?

16) Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damageStinging, burning, pins-and-needles, numbness all are signs of nerve damage. Even the way your body was positioned during surgery can cause nerve damage.

17) Obturator Nerve – Symptoms in your mid-thighs (saddle region).

18) Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric Nerve – Symptoms in your pubic region.

19) Genitofemoral Nerve – Symptoms in your inner groin.

20) Femoral Nerve – Symptoms in your outer thighs

21) Pudendal Nerve Entrapment – Symptoms in your “sit spot.”

22) Fibular Neuropathy – Symptoms on the outside lower legs

23) Saphenous Nerve – Symptoms on your inner lower legs

24) Piriformis Syndrome – Symptoms across your buttocks.

25) Sciatica – Symptoms all the way down your leg.

26) Peripheral Neuropathy – Symptoms from the bottom of your feet and up your legs, even your hands can be involved.

MESH IS NOT FOR BODIES 2


If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to PelvicMeshOwnersGuide.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

When You Can’t Sit Down, Might Just Be Pudendal Nerve Damage

Just can’t help but link to this song for today’s blog: Paul Revere and the Raiders’ “Can’t Sit Down.”

If you can’t sit down, it may be more serious than just that you’ve been listening to Rock ’n Roll, it may be that you have pudendal nerve damage. That problem may be your own trouble with pelvic mesh. Sitting down is one of the most basic functions of modern day life. We sit at work, during meals, while driving, going to the movies, using our computers, even reading to our children. It can be caused by bike riding (Cyclist’s Syndrome), repeated lifting, prolonged sitting or injury during pelvic surgery. Pudendal nerve injuries are common complaints of mesh that we hear about in support groups.

mesh is for badminton2

The pudendal nerve innervates areas around your perineum, anus, clitoris and the muscles you sit on. The pain you feel could be burning, stabbing, aching, or a loss of sensation. It can flare up from time to time or it can come quickly and stay for good—or it can come slowly and worsen over time.

Three categories of pudendal problems are pudendal neuralgia, PN, (pain along the course of the nerve due to inflammation), pudendal neuropathy (a diseased or injured nerve), and pudendal nerve entrapment, PNE, (associated with the nerve being tied down by the surrounding tissues).

Symptoms
•    Stinging, burning, stabbing, aching, knife-like pain, irritation, cramping, spasm, tightness, pins and needles, numbness, or hyper- sensitivity over your anal region, perineum, vulva or clitoris
•    Pain that worsens while sitting and improves while standing or walking
•    Lying down may or may not relieve the pain
•    Pain can be in one area or several, on one or both sides.
•    Problems with urination, defecation or sexual function
•    Increased pain after defecating

Each person’s symptoms are unique. A pudendal nerve entrapment (PNE) diagnosis can be made by listening to the patient’s description of the problem, physical exam, with a special MRI called a MRI neurogram of the pudendal nerves, or an ultrasound.
Pudendal nerve pain
Treatment: Medications such as custom made suppositories to relax your pelvic nerves and muscles may help. Physical therapy with gentle massage, accupuncture, pudendal nerve block guided by CT or ultrasound, caudal epidural injections, pulsed radio frequency ablation to the pudendal nerves, botox injections, spinal cord stimulation. Reference.

atrapamiento-nervio-pudendo

If you’d like to join an online support group and learn about erosion, partial removals, surgeons, or just find out that you are not alone, check the list of support groups here.

Subscribe to MeshTroubles.com to learn more about pelvic mesh. I’d like to hear from you if you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic. Comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.

12 Pelvic Mesh Common Complications That Should Make You Think Twice

Plastics and human flesh, what could possibly go wrong? Ever since the day you had mesh implanted, you’ve had no end of troubles but your doctor says, “It’s not mesh related.”

Severe and life-threatening mesh complications are more frequent and widespread than doctors realize. Here are a dozen mesh problems that women have reported to the FDA:

    1.    Excessive Bleeding
    2.    Infections:    
            ⁃    Urinary tract infection, Kidney infection
            ⁃    Wound infections
    3.    Organ perforation
            ⁃    Bladder injury
            ⁃    Bowel Injury
            ⁃    Fistula (a hole between two organs)
    4.    Wound Opening Up After Stitches –  (also called dehiscence)
    5.    Erosion – (also called exposure, extrusion or protrusion)
    6.    Bladder problems:
            ⁃    Incontinence “I sneeze, I pee.”
            ⁃    Urinary Retention “I can’t pee right.”
    7.    Dyspareunia – pain during sexual intercourse
    8.    Intractable painPart 1 & Part 2
    9.    Vaginal scarring/shrinkage
    10.   Emotional Damage
    11.    Multiple surgeries
    12.    Neuro-muscular problems – nerve damage
              ⁃    Can’t sit down
              ⁃    Can’t walk
              ⁃    Wheelchair bound

mesh is for badminton2

Most of these complications will require additional intervention, including medical or surgical treatment and hospitalizations.

About complete/full removals vs partial removals:

I think it is crucial to let you know the best best surgeons are saying that a complete removal of pelvic mesh is the only solution.  This is not the usual or accepted intervention done by most medical centers. We will concentrate on this very soon, but know this: in January of 2011, the National Institute of Health published this statement. “Complications seemed to be more frequent in the group with complete mesh excision, although this difference was not statistically significant.” I strongly recommend you print it out and take it to your surgeon when you are discussing solutions to mesh problems. Tell him/her that complications from complete removals are not statistically different from chipping away at the problem, setting up the patient for multiple surgeries and thereby spreading toxins and infections.

Please send questions or urgent problems by email to daywriter1@gmail.com Meshtroubles.com #pelvisinflames @daywrites