Why So Many Doctors are Bad Doctors – Mesh Trouble

To those who have been participating in surgical mesh discussions, it comes as no surprise that the practice of medicine in 2016 has completely broken down. It is not safe to become a patient these days yet, by the very nature of living in this world of fast cars and eating unhealthy food, it is inevitable that most people will need to enter the Healthcare System someday and take their chances that they professionals will do right by them.

Discussions abound about how surgical mesh was cleared for implantation inside human bodies by corrupt Food and Drug Administration officials — insiders from the pharmaceutical industry. The number of deaths that occur from medical mistakes is over 300,000, and is considered the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Many other discussion participants report cruel, dismissive, even dangerous treatment by doctors in office and hospital settings; yet most of us are unaware of two things that should be — but are not — changing the game in favor of the patient.

prison mesh welded wire copy

In 1986 Congress passed legislation that bad doctors must be reported to a national database called the National Practitioner Data Base [PD2] in order to protect the consumer (The Healthcare Quality Improvement Act). That is you. But you have no access to the database either to report bad doctors or to find out if your doctor is bad. Usually, the only way to discover you have chosen a bad doctor is to find out the hard way, by being exposed to rude, aggressive, dismissive, or harmful treatment yourself. You may get lucky and be part of an private discussion group between patients and hear about some of the bad ones and avoid trouble, even disaster, for yourself. Websites like Vitals.com, etc. submit to pressure from lawyers and doctors to remove feedback that would have negative consequences to the doctors and are not reliable if you are trying to protect yourself from harm.

Every battle has its heroes and for patients and we found two: Bob Wachter and an anonymous emergency doctor (Shadowfax) who runs a fittingly named blog, “Moving Meat.” Both of them acknowledge that today’s medicine puts the priority of the patient well below the protection of the doctor’s career and reputation. Both say the NPDB is not doing its job.

What do you think? What is your experience in today’s medical world? Do you feel safe? Protected? How is the Healthcare Improvement Act working for you?

  • If you are helped by what you read here or if you need to know more about any particular topic, comment below or email me privately at daywriter1@gmail.com.
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    http://community.the-hospitalist.org/2009/06/01/is-hospital-peer-review-a-sham-well-mostly-yes/

    http://allbleedingstops.blogspot.com/2009/06/review-of-peer-review.html

    [PD1]https://www.npdb.hrsa.gov/resources/titleIv.jsp

    [PD2]https://www.npdb.hrsa.gov/topNavigation/aboutUs.jsp

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